World's largest neurosurgical society launches the specialty's first comprehensive global journal

August 18, 2010, Elsevier

The World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) representing more than 30,000 neurosurgeons, 114 individual societies and 100 nations has launched World Neurosurgery, the specialty's first publication acting as a global forum for not only high level peer reviewed, clinical and laboratory science, but also the social, political, economic, cultural and educational issues that affect research and care delivery regionally and from a global perspective.

World Neurosurgery is headed by the eminent and globally renowned surgeon, innovator, and scientist Michael L.J. Apuzzo at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and is published by Elsevier.

The inaugural issue's focus (August) addresses problems attendant to neurosurgical care in East Africa.

The unique journal has assembled an internationally based support group of more than 600 global associates and a panel of continental editors who will advise and facilitate the focus on pertinent issues related to their regions. A senior advisory panel comprised of more than 50 leading neurosurgeons representing all regions and significant existing neurosurgical journals advise on policy and content.

The journal designed to be the specialty's first global forum will be published monthly and also disseminated through secondary websites administered by the publisher internationally to more than 20 million clinicians and scientists.

Considered iconic in the field, Apuzzo, one of the world's best known and respected neurosurgeons, has made numerous contributions to intracranial neurosurgery. He is Editor Emeritus of Neurosurgery, Operative Neurosurgery, and On-Line, publications that were brought to pre-eminent status under his direction. He is the Edwin M. Todd, Trent H. Wells, Professor of Neurosurgical Surgery, , Biology and Physics at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

"This unique concept has met with virtually universal support and excitement internationally. The National Library of Medicine considers that the publication will serve as a template for other journals in the general medical field," says Apuzzo.

More information: For more information, visit www.WorldNeurosurgery.org

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