Daylight savings time can be dangerous

March 14, 2011

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 13, but a word of caution. Studies have found that losing an hour can be hazardous for your health.

On average, people go to work or school on the first Monday of after sleeping 40 fewer minutes than normal. Researchers have reported there's a higher risk of heart attacks, traffic accidents and workplace injuries on the first Monday of Daylight Saving Time.

"Many people already are chronically sleep-deprived, and Daylight Saving Time can make them even more tired for a few days," said Dr. Nidhi Undevia, medical director of the Program at Loyola University Health System.

Undevia offers these tips for coping with Daylight Saving Time:

-- In the days before the time change, go to bed and wake up 10 or 15 minutes earlier each day.

-- Don't nap on the Saturday before the time change.

-- To help reset your internal body clock, expose yourself to sunlight in the morning as early as you can.

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