Yoga calms heart pace, cuts anxiety: study

April 3, 2011

People who suffer from irregular heartbeat could see their episodes cut in half if they do yoga regularly, according to a study released Saturday in the United States.

Doing yoga three times a week also reduced depression and anxiety while boosting people's opinion of their own social and mental well-being, said the research presented at a New Orleans cardiology conference.

"It appears yoga has a significant impact on helping to regulate patients' heart beat and improves their overall quality of life," said lead study author Dhanunjaya Lakkireddy, associate professor of medicine at the University of Kansas Hospital.

The study followed 49 patients who suffer from , an condition that arises when the heart's natural electrical signals fire off in a disorganized way, causing the heart to quiver.

For the first three months of the trial, patients were allowed to engage in their usual exercise routine.

For the second three months, patients attended three yoga sessions per week with a certified instructor, and were encouraged to practice at home with an educational DVD.

All the patients in the study were new to yoga.

Researchers measured the subjects' episodes of irregular heartbeats using portable monitors and log books where the patients recorded their own symptoms.

The intervention "significantly reduced" episodes by about half on average, compared to the control portion of the study when patients did their own exercises, said the study.

Depression and anxiety scores on self-reported surveys were also lower; and physical function, general health, vitality, social functioning and mental health were higher.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

February 22, 2018
We all have that Facebook friend—or 10—who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

Electronic health records don't reduce administrative costs

February 21, 2018
The federal government thought that adopting certified electronic health record systems (EHR) would reduce administrative costs for physicians in a variety of specialties. However, a major new study conducted by researchers ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

nada
not rated yet Apr 04, 2011
Another waste of taxpayer money. Why did they need to "study" something that has been mainstream with "shrinks" for 50 years?

Claire Weeks, Hope and Help for your Nerves; 1969.

This kind of waste needs to be shut down.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.