Bird flu outbreak hits Dutch chicken farm

June 24, 2011

Dutch authorities were slaughtering thousands of chickens at a poultry farm in central Netherlands after an outbreak of a bird flu variety there, an agriculture ministry spokesman said.

"Bird flu has been discovered at a poultry farm with some 47,000 in Creil, in the (central) Flevoland province," Murco Mijnlieff said, adding it was believed to be an H7 low-pathogenic variety.

"The farm is being cleaned up and the chickens are being killed," as a result of the outbreak, Mijnlieff told AFP.

The outbreak was discovered earlier this week when the farmer noticed a high number of chickens being ill and a lowered . Tests were done, confirming , Mijnlieff said.

Three other farms in the area were being monitored and authorities have introduced a three kilometre (1.8 mile) radius transport ban on poultry, eggs and poultry waste.

Mijnlieff said however authorities believed it was a low-pathogenic variety of H7, but more tests were being done with full results expected Saturday.

Although a more dangerous variety of high-pathogenic H7 was highly contagious and deadly to chickens, it would cause no more than a slight cold among humans, Mijnlieff said.

Explore further: Japanese scientists track bird flu strains

Related Stories

Japanese scientists track bird flu strains

July 11, 2005
The Japanese government will destroy 8,500 chickens at a poultry farm in Bando, Ibaraki prefecture, after scientists found genes of the avian flu virus.

Japan culls 10,000 chickens to contain bird flu

January 22, 2011
Japan began slaughtering some 10,000 chickens Saturday at a poultry farm in western Miyazaki prefecture in a bid to contain an outbreak of bird flu, the local government said.

Bird flu outbreak reported in Russia

October 1, 2007
Hundreds of thousands of birds at a poultry farm in Russia's southern Krasnodar Terroritory are being destroyed following an outbreak of bird flu.

236,000 birds killed in flu outbreak

November 27, 2006
South Korea slaughtered 236,000 chickens and ducks after tests confirmed an outbreak of a highly virulent type of bird flu, the government said.

Cause of bird flu outbreak tracked

January 19, 2007
Agriculture officials in Japan say a bird flu outbreak last week involved a highly virulent strain of the flu virus.

Russia bans W. Va. poultry for bird flu

April 5, 2007
Russia has imposed a temporary ban on poultry products imported from West Virginia after turkeys at a Pendleton County farm tested positive for bird flu.

Recommended for you

Drug targets for Ebola, Dengue, and Zika viruses found in lab study

December 13, 2018
No drugs are currently available to treat Ebola, Dengue, or Zika viruses, which infect millions of people every year and result in severe illness, birth defects, and even death. New research from the Gladstone Institutes ...

Faster test for Ebola shows promising results in field trials

December 13, 2018
A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Senegal and Guinea, in cooperation with Becton, Dickinson and Company (BD), has developed a faster test for the Ebola virus than those currently in use. In their paper published ...

Urbanisation and air travel leading to growing risk of pandemic

December 13, 2018
Increased arrivals by air and urbanisation are the two main factors leading to a growing vulnerability to pandemics in our cities, a University of Sydney research team has found.

Researchers discover new interactions between Ebola virus and human proteins

December 13, 2018
Several new connections have been discovered between the proteins of the Ebola virus and human host cells, a finding that provides insight on ways to prevent the deadly Ebola virus from reproducing and could lead to novel ...

Faecal transplants, 'robotic guts' and the fight against deadly gut bugs

December 13, 2018
A simple compound found in our gut could help to stop dangerous bacteria behind severe, and sometimes fatal, hospital infections.

Taking the virus out of a mosquito's bite

December 12, 2018
They approach with the telltale sign—a high-pitched whine. It's a warning that you are a mosquito's next meal. But that mosquito might carry a virus, and now the virus is in you. Now, with the help of state-of-the-art technology, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.