Analgesics use associated with increased risk for renal cell carcinoma

October 24, 2011, American Association for Cancer Research

Use of acetaminophen and nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was associated with a significantly increased risk for developing renal cell carcinoma, according to data presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held Oct. 22-25, 2011.

Eunyoung Cho, Sc.D., assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and associate at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a preliminary meta-analysis of 18 studies from six countries to examine analgesics use and its relation to the risk for (RCC).

"Our meta-analysis was the largest analysis of analgesics and risk for RCC," Cho said. "Our study is the first few of those studies raising [the] possibility that these commonly used painkillers may elevate the risk for certain ."

Cho and colleagues conducted a Medline database search for case-control or cohort studies on acetaminophen, aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (), published between 1966 and July 1, 2011. They found 12 studies examining risk for acetaminophen, 12 for aspirin and five for NSAIDs.

Results demonstrated that any use of acetaminophen was associated with a 33 percent increased risk for RCC, and use of other NSAIDs was linked with a 26 percent increased risk. No significantly increased risk for RCC was found with the use of aspirin.

The meta-analysis revealed similar trends with high-dose analgesics intake. Researchers found no significant difference in associations based on study design, type of controls in case-control studies, study outcome or gender.

"The positive association with nonaspirin NSAIDs was somewhat expected since we recently published on the association from two prospective studies [in ], which were included in this meta-analysis," Cho said. "However, the association with use of acetaminophen was not found in the publication and was thus unexpected. Several relatively small studies of use of acetaminophen and RCC did suggest positive associations. When we conducted a meta-analysis of these studies to improve statistical power, the summary results came out statistically significant."

Explore further: Association found between long-term use of nonaspirin anti-inflammatory drugs and renal cell cancer

Related Stories

Association found between long-term use of nonaspirin anti-inflammatory drugs and renal cell cancer

September 12, 2011
Long-term use of nonaspirin anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of renal cell cancer (RCC), according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Study links acetaminophen to lower prostate cancer risk

May 23, 2011
A new study from American Cancer Society researchers finds use of 30 tablets a month or more of acetaminophen for five or more years was associated with an estimated 38% lower risk of prostate cancer. The study appears in ...

Recommended for you

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

January 18, 2018
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

Researchers find a way to 'starve' cancer

January 18, 2018
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital ...

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.