Canadian breast cancer screening guidelines would cost thousands of lives

November 21, 2011

The American College of Radiology today denounced new breast cancer screening guidelines by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health (CTFOPH), which recommend against annual screening of women ages 40-49 and would extend time between screens for older women.

An ACR news release said "the CTFOPH guidelines ignore results of recent landmark randomized control trials which show that regular screening reduces breast cancer deaths in these women by approximately a third" and that "While implementation of the CTFOPH guidelines may save money on screening costs, the result will be thousands of unnecessary breast cancer deaths."

The ACR stated that the CTFOPH guidelines largely mirror those released by the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) in 2009 and that "The USPSTF approach misses 75 percent of cancers in women 40-49 and up to a third of cancers in women 50-74."

The College pointed to an analysis (Hendrick and Helvie) published in the , showed that, if USPSTF recommendations were followed, 6,500 additional women each year in the U.S. would die from breast cancer. The ACR said "A similar proportion of Canadian women will likely die unnecessarily each year from if the CTFOPH guidelines are followed."

Barbara Monsees, MD, chair of the American College of Radiology Commission, added that "Panels without profound expertise in should not be issuing guidelines. These recommendations are derived from flawed analyses and they defy common sense. Women and providers who are looking for guidance are getting bad advice from both the U.S. and Canadian Task Forces."

Explore further: ACR, SBI support updated ACOG recommendations that women begin annual mammograms at age 40

More information: The ACR statement can be read at: www.acr.org/SecondaryMainMenuC … ines-Cost-Lives.aspx

Related Stories

ACR, SBI support updated ACOG recommendations that women begin annual mammograms at age 40

July 20, 2011
The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging applaud and support updated American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) recommendations that women begin getting annual mammograms at age ...

New breast cancer screening guidelines released

November 21, 2011
New breast cancer screening guidelines for women at average risk of breast cancer, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), recommend no routine mammography screening for women aged 40-49 and extend the screening ...

New studies show negative effects from revised mammography recommendation for women, ages 40-49

May 2, 2011
Two new studies reveal that the United States Preventative Services Task Force's (USPSTF) recommendation to no longer screen women ages 40-49 for breast cancer using mammograms has begun to negatively affect the number of ...

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

Researchers target undruggable cancers

October 19, 2017
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable," has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.