Vitamin B reduces work stress

November 9, 2011
Vitamin B reduces work stress

(Medical Xpress) -- Increasing your Vitamin B intake could significantly reduce work-related stress, a clinical trial conducted at Swinburne University of Technology has shown.

The results of the three-month trial, where participants were given a course of either high dose supplements or a placebo, have been accepted for publication in the journal Human Psychopharmacology.

According to study leader Professor Con Stough, at the beginning of the trial the researchers assessed sixty participants against factors such as , , mood, and strain, and then re-evaluated them at 30 and 90 days. 

“At the end of the three-month period, those in the Vitamin B group reported much lower levels of work stress than they did at the beginning of the trial,” he said.  “In fact, participants experienced an almost 20 per cent improvement in stress levels.

“On the other hand, those in the group showed no significant change.”

While this was the first study of its kind, Professor Stough said that the results were perhaps unsurprising, given the important role Vitamin B plays in cognitive function.

“Vitamin B, which is found in whole unprocessed foods such as meat, beans and wholegrains, is integral to the synthesis of neurotransmitters critical to psychological wellbeing,” he said. “But the reality is that many people don’t get enough Vitamin B from their diet, so they are turning to vitamin supplementation.”

With occupational stress increasing in Australian society, Professor Stough said that it is having a significant impact on individuals, organisations and the community.

“Anything we can do to reduce work-related stress is a good thing,” he said. “By lowering stress, we also lower the risk of health problems such as cardiovascular disease, depression and anxiety.

“And from an organisational perspective, reducing your workers’ stress is likely to improve productivity and minimise stress claims made due to workplace pressures.”

While the results of the study present a strong case for Vitamin B supplementation, according to Professor Stough further research is still needed. “Ideally we’d like to conduct a larger trial with more participants that would investigate the effects of Vitamin B supplementation over two-to-three years.”

The study used Blackmores’ Executive B Stress Formula. It was jointly funded by Blackmores and Swinburne University of Technology’s Centre for Psychopharmacology, which is the largest research group in the world examining the cognitive and mood effects of natural products, nutritional and nutritional interventions.

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Nerdyguy
5 / 5 (1) Nov 09, 2011
This is b.s. science. How do they know it wasn't the vit. H that helped? They don't.

See below for the full ingredients list from this commercial supplement.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine hydrochloride) 75 mg Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 10 mg Nicotinamide 100 mg Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine hydrochloride) 25 mg Calcium ascorbate 145 mg Ascorbic acid 130 mg (Total Vitamin C 250mg) Vitamin E (d-alpha-Tocopheryl acid succinate 41.3 mg) 50 IU Vitamin B5 68 mg (Pantothenic acid from Calcium pantothenate 75mg) Magnesium phosphate 140 mg Calcium phosphate 100 mg Potassium phosphate monobasic 117 mg Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) 30 mcg Vitamin H (Biotin) 20 mcg Folic acid 150 mcg Avena sativa (Oats) extract equivalent to dry seed 250 mg Passiflora incarnata (Passion flower) extract equivalent to dry flowering and fruiting herb 100 mg Lecithin 50 mg Choline bitartrate 25 mg Inositol 25 mg

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