Enriched skimmed milk may curb frequency of gout flare-ups

January 24, 2012, British Medical Journal

A daily dose of skimmed milk, enriched with two components found in dairy products, may help to curb the frequency of painful gout flare-ups, indicates research published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Previous long term research has shown that the risk of gout is greater among those whose diet is low on dairy products.

And experimental studies indicate that certain components of dairy products, particularly glycomacropeptide (GMP) and G600 milk fat extract (G600), seem to dampen down the to gout crystals.

The authors studied the frequency of gout flare-ups in 120 patients with the condition over a period of three months. All the patients had experienced at least two flare-ups in the preceding four months.

The patients were divided into three different treatment groups: lactose powder; skimmed ; or skimmed milk powder enriched with GMP and G600. Each powder was mixed in 250 ml of water as a vanilla flavoured shake and drunk daily.

The patients attended a rheumatology clinic monthly to check on their requirement for medication and their symptoms, which they recorded using a daily flare diary and validated pain scale.

There were no significant differences among the three groups at the start of the study in terms of frequency of gout flare-ups, pain, or drugs used to treat the condition.

In all, 102 patients completed the three month study. And the results showed that those on the enriched skimmed milk diet had a significantly greater reduction in gout flare-ups compared with the other two groups.

They also had greater improvements in pain and the amount of uric acid in their urine than those in the other two groups. This was matched by a trend towards a reduction in the number of tender joints.

The enriched skimmed milk diet did not boost weight gain or increase the levels of potentially harmful .

"This is the first reported randomised of in gout management, and suggests that daily intake of skimmed milk powder enriched with GMP and G600 may reduce the frequency of gout flares," conclude the authors.

Explore further: Study finds CT scans can help detect gout cases traditional tests miss

Related Stories

Study finds CT scans can help detect gout cases traditional tests miss

November 6, 2011
X-ray images known as CT scans can help confirm gout in patients who are suspected of having the painful condition but receive negative results from traditional tests, a Mayo Clinic study has found. The type of CT scan analyzed, ...

Obesity concerns result in milk ban

May 26, 2006
Whole milk is to be banned from British schools in the campaign against childhood obesity, allowing for the serving of only skimmed or semi-skimmed milk.

Sugary soft drinks linked to increased risk of gout in men

February 1, 2008
Consumption of sugar sweetened soft drinks and fructose is strongly associated with an increased risk of gout in men, finds a study published on bmj.com today.

Vitamin C intake associated with lower risk of gout in men

March 9, 2009
Men with higher vitamin C intake appear less likely to develop gout, a painful type of arthritis, according to a report in the March 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Dual-energy CT may be useful in evaluating the severity of gout, study suggests

April 30, 2011
The incidence of gout is on the rise and duel energy CT has the potential to allow non-invasive diagnosis of the disease, according to radiologists at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, in Vancouver, ...

Women with gout at greater risk of heart attack than men

February 8, 2010
Women with gout are at greater risk of a heart attack than men with the disease, indicates research published ahead of print in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Recommended for you

A versatile vaccine that can protect mice from emerging tick-borne viruses

December 18, 2018
A group of researchers led by Michael Diamond of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that is effective in mice against Powassan virus, an emerging tick-borne virus that can cause ...

How cholera bacteria make people so sick

December 18, 2018
The enormous adaptability of the cholera bacterium explains why it is able to claim so many victims. Professor Ariane Briegel from the Leiden Institute of Biology has now discovered that this adaptability is due to rapid ...

Green leafy vegetables may prevent liver steatosis

December 17, 2018
A larger portion of green leafy vegetables in the diet may reduce the risk of developing liver steatosis, or fatty liver. In a study published in PNAS researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show how a larger intake ...

Discovery of novel mechanisms that cause migraines

December 17, 2018
Researchers at CNRS, Université Côte d'Azur and Inserm have demonstrated a new mechanism related to the onset of migraine. They found how a mutation that causes dysfunction in a protein which inhibits neuronal electrical ...

RNA processing and antiviral immunity

December 14, 2018
The RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) are intracellular enzyme sentries that detect viral infection and initiate a first line of antiviral defense. The cellular molecules that activate RLRs in vivo are not clear.

Faster test for Ebola shows promising results in field trials

December 13, 2018
A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Senegal and Guinea, in cooperation with Becton, Dickinson and Company (BD), has developed a faster test for the Ebola virus than those currently in use. In their paper published ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

kevinrtrs
2 / 5 (2) Jan 24, 2012
All good and well, except if you're lactose intolerant - which also implies that your body is likely to react negatively to milk protein, in spite of adding enzymes to deal with the lactose...life is tough!!!!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.