Researchers identity potential biomarker for osteoarthritis

February 5, 2012

Henry Ford Hospital researchers have identified for the first time two molecules that hold promise as a biomarker for measuring cartilage damage associated with osteoarthritis.

Researchers say the concentration of two molecules called non-coding RNAs in blood were associated with mild cartilage damage in 30 patients who were one year removed from to repair an , or ACL, injury.

The findings are described as significant in the ongoing and tedious search of biomarkers for osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis that afflicts an estimated 27 million Americans aged 25 and older. It is caused by the normal aging process or wear and tear of a joint.

The study is being presented Saturday at the annual Orthopaedic Research Society in San Francisco.

"Our results suggest we have identified a long-awaited for this leading cause of disability," says Gary Gibson, Ph.D., director of Henry Ford's Bone and Joint Center and the study's lead author.

"For various pathology reasons associated with the variability of the disease and challenging blood biochemistry, developing a biomarker for has been very elusive. But we believe our work shows great promise. The next step is to expand the number of patients studied and determine whether the degree in blood concentration can determine if the cartilage damage will worsen over time.

"Our ultimate goal is to develop a biomarker that can be used in the development of future treatments to prevent the progression of the disease," he added.

Explore further: Progress in tissue engineering to repair joint damage in osteoarthritis

Related Stories

Progress in tissue engineering to repair joint damage in osteoarthritis

June 8, 2011
Medical scientists now have "clear" evidence that the damaged cartilage tissue in osteoarthritis and other painful joint disorders can be encouraged to regrow and regenerate, and are developing tissue engineering technology ...

New research points to a possible gender link in knee injuries

July 7, 2011
Gender may be associated with an increased risk of cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knees, according to research being presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual ...

Glucocorticoid treatment may prevent long-term damage to joints

September 2, 2011
Joint injury can result in irreversible damage of cartilage which, despite treatment and surgery, often eventually leads to osteoarthritis (OA) in later life. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal ...

MRI techniques can detect early osteoarthritis

August 15, 2011
Researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center's Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Radiology found that advanced MRI techniques can be used to detect subtle changes in joint cartilage microstructure – and provide physicians ...

Loss of motion after knee surgery may increase osteoarthritis risk, research suggests

July 9, 2011
The onset of osteoarthritis may be related to a loss of knee motion after reconstructive ACL surgery, as noted in new research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in San Diego, ...

Recommended for you

Study shows prevalence of knee osteoarthritis has doubled since World War II

August 14, 2017
The average American today is twice as likely to be diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis than in the years before World War II, Harvard scientists say, but that increase can't be blamed on the reasons most might think.

Researchers find arthritis drug could treat blood cancer patients

August 3, 2017
Blood cancer sufferers could be treated with a simple arthritis drug, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered.

Fluid in the knee holds clues for why osteoarthritis is more common in females

June 26, 2017
Researchers have more evidence that males and females are different, this time in the fluid that helps protect the cartilage in their knee joints.

Biologics before triple therapy not cost effective for rheumatoid arthritis

May 29, 2017
Stepping up to biologic therapy when methotrexate monotherapy fails offers minimal incremental benefit over using a combination of drugs known as triple therapy, yet incurs large costs for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ...

Drug for refractory psoriatic arthritis shows promise in clinical trial

May 24, 2017
In a pivotal phase-3 clinical trial led by a Stanford University School of Medicine investigator, patients with psoriatic arthritis for whom standard-of-care pharmaceutical treatments have provided no lasting relief experienced ...

Cross-species links identified for osteoarthritis

May 17, 2017
New research from the University of Liverpool, published today in the journal npj Systems Biology and Applications, has identified 'cell messages' that could help identify the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.