Most California hospitals implementing infection control

March 17, 2012
Most california hospitals implementing infection control
Most California hospitals implement some policies to improve infection control for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), primarily methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but few policies are associated with lower MDRO rates, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

(HealthDay) -- Most California hospitals implement some policies to improve infection control for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), primarily methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but few policies are associated with lower MDRO rates, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Monika Pogorzelska, Ph.D., M.P.H., and associates from the Columbia University School of Nursing in New York City, analyzed 2010 survey data from 180 California hospitals to identify infection control policies, structural characteristics, and rates of MDRO.

The researchers found that 87 percent of the responding hospitals reported targeted MRSA screening on admission. Contact precautions were implemented by the majority of hospitals for patients with confirmed MDRO or difficile. Implementation of presumptive isolation/contact precautions for patients with pending screens was less frequent. Few infection control policies correlated with reduced MDRO rates. There was a significantly lower rate of MRSA infections in hospitals with a board certified infection control officer.

"Although most California hospitals are involved in activities to decrease MDRO, there is variation in specific activities utilized with the most focus placed on ," the authors write. "This study highlights the importance of certification and its significant impact on infection rates."

Explore further: Infection control certification associated with lower MRSA infection rates

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Related Stories

Infection control certification associated with lower MRSA infection rates

March 9, 2012
Hospitals whose infection prevention and control programs are led by a director who is board certified in infection prevention and control have significantly lower rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ...

Recommended for you

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Flu may be spread just by breathing, new study shows; coughing and sneezing not required

January 18, 2018
It is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new University of Maryland-led study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

Fresh approach to tuberculosis vaccine offers better protection

January 17, 2018
A unique platform that resulted in a promising HIV vaccine has also led to a new, highly effective vaccine against tuberculosis that is moving toward testing in humans.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.