Hops compounds improve health of obese diabetic mice

March 28, 2012

A class of compounds found in hops, the crop generally known for its role in beer production, reduces weight gain in obese and diabetic mice, according to a study published Mar. 28 in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

Eight weeks of treatment with the compounds, called tetrahydro iso-alpha acids, also reduced gut permeability and normalized insulin sensitivity markers in the mice, among other beneficial metabolic effects.

Hops have been known to contain anti-inflammatory compounds with potential medicinal uses for metabolic disorders, like and type 2 diabetes, which are associated with low-grade inflammation. These new results suggest a novel mechanism contributing to the positive effects of the investigated treatment, the authors write. The work was led by Patrice Cani of the Université catholique de Louvain in Brussels, Belgium.

Explore further: New tactic for controlling blood sugar in diabetes contradicts current view of the disease

More information: Everard A, Geurts L, Van Roye M, Delzenne NM, Cani PD (2012) Tetrahydro iso-Alpha Acids from Hops Improve Glucose Homeostasis and Reduce Body Weight Gain and Metabolic Endotoxemia in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice. PLoS ONE 7(3): e33858. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033858

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