Vitamin D-fortified yogurt drink may lower risk of heart disease in type 2 diabetics

March 29, 2012

Daily intake of vitamin D-fortified doogh (Persian yogurt drink) improved inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetics and extra calcium conferred additional anti-inflammatory benefits, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM).

Inflammation is known to have a central role in the development of type 2 diabetes and its further complications like and stroke. Vitamin D carries benefits for skeletal health but evidence of an anti-inflammatory effect from clinical studies in humans remains scarce.

"Our previous research showed that improvement of vitamin D status by regular daily intake of a fortified yogurt drink resulted in lowered in diabetic patients," said Tirang Neyestani, PhD, of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran and lead author of the study. "The current study found that consuming a vitamin D-fortified yogurt drink also decreased serum substances like highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) which are known to have an inflammatory role."

In this study, researchers conducted a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial over 12 weeks in 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Study participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups to receive two 250mL bottles a day of either plain doogh, vitamin D-fortified doogh or calcium plus vitamin D-fortified doogh. Vitamin D levels, , and inflammatory markers such as hsCRP, fibrinogen and adiponectin were measured in blood samples taken from study participants.

"Our study showed for the first time that adiponectin, a substance secreted by fat tissue that has an anti-inflammatory effect, increased when calcium and vitamin D-fortified doogh was consumed," said Neyestani. "Our findings may offer interesting therapeutic options for diabetic patients."

Explore further: Vitamin D-fortified yoghurt improves cholesterol levels and heart disease biomarkers for diabetics

More information: The article, "Improvement of vitamin D status via daily intake of fortified yogurt drink either with or without extra calcium ameliorates systemic inflammatory biomarkers, including adipokines, in the subjects with type 2 diabetes," appears in the June 2012 issue of JCEM.

Related Stories

Vitamin D-fortified yoghurt improves cholesterol levels and heart disease biomarkers for diabetics

November 24, 2011
People with diabetes are known to have an increased risk of heart disease. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine shows that regular consumption of a vitamin D-fortified yoghurt drink ...

Low vitamin D levels may contribute to development of Type 2 diabetes

December 5, 2011
A recent study of obese and non-obese children found that low vitamin D levels are significantly more prevalent in obese children and are associated with risk factors for type 2 diabetes. This study was accepted for publication ...

Recommended for you

Getting fat to 'talk' again could lower blood glucose and weight

August 22, 2017
Diabetes is a tough disease to manage. Oral medications, insulin shots, close monitoring of blood sugar, dietary changes and exercise can all factor into a person's treatment regimen. Now researchers are exploring a novel, ...

Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progression

August 21, 2017
Researchers from Umeå University in Sweden describe a new method to study biochemical changes that occur in the pancreas during the development of diabetes. The method, recently published in Scientific Reports, is based ...

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control

August 17, 2017
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) ...

Smart mat detects early warning signs of foot ulcers

August 16, 2017
While completing his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in the mid-2000s, Jon Bloom saw his fair share of foot amputations among patients with diabetes. The culprit: infected foot ulcers.

The best place to treat type 1 diabetes might be just under your skin

August 14, 2017
A group of U of T researchers have demonstrated that the space under our skin might be an optimal location to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D).

New measure of insulin-making cells could gauge diabetes progression, treatment

August 10, 2017
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a new measurement for the volume and activity of beta cells, the source of the sugar-regulating hormone insulin.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.