Mexican woman due to give birth to nine in May

April 27, 2012

A Mexican woman is due to give birth to six girls and three boys in May, the local media is reporting.

"I feel different because there are nine of them. I feel odd, but so be it. We must move forward and hopefully everything goes well," Karla Vanessa Perez Garcia, a resident of the town of Arteaga in the state of Coahuila, told the Televisa television network.

Perez Garcia and her husband, Juan Bernardo Morales, who works as a mechanic, already have four children. Three of them were triplets born last November.

The 32-year-old woman learned she was carrying nine in January, when she was four months pregnant. Her doctors have scheduled a for May 20.

"With the tests and everything I knew I was pregnant, but after the fourth month, through a vaginal , they told me, 'You know what? There are so many of them' and so be it. I almost fainted," said Perez Garcia.

The doctors have told her that despite the large number of babies, their weight is good for this type of case.

"For seven months, for the weight the mother is telling us she has, the is giving an average weight of one kilo, 200 grams for each baby. That's excellent," Jose Zavala, director of the System for the Integral Development of the Family of Coahuila, told Televisa.

Mexican authorities already have pledged to help the after the birth of the children.

"What am I going to do with nine? I am going to go crazy," said Perez Garcia, who is taking situation calmly.

There have been at least two previous cases of nonutuplets -- one set was delivered in Australia in 1971, and another in Malaysia in 1999.

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