Missed sleep may contribute to asthma morbidity

July 17, 2012
Missed sleep may contribute to asthma morbidity
Missed sleep may contribute to asthma morbidity in urban children, according to a study published in the July issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

(HealthDay) -- Missed sleep may contribute to asthma morbidity in urban children, according to a study published in the July issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Lauren C. Daniel, Ph.D., from Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues assessed the associations between missed sleep, -related quality of life, and indicators of asthma morbidity, based on responses from parents of 147 with asthma. Participating , aged 6 to 13 years, were from Latino, African-American, and non-Latino white backgrounds.

Across the sample the researchers found that higher reports of missed sleep correlated with more frequent school absences, more limitations on activity, and lower quality of life. There were stronger associations between missed sleep and asthma morbidity for Latino children than for non-Latino white and African-American children. The associations between missed sleep and asthma morbidity were stronger for children with higher anxiety than for children with lower anxiety.

"The findings from this study suggest that missed sleep is an important factor to consider when examining asthma morbidity and child functioning," the authors write. "Clinically, health care professionals should be especially attuned to the effects of missed sleep and anxiety on asthma morbidity in Latino children because they are more susceptible to disruptions in daily functioning when experiencing disrupted ."

Explore further: New tool to assess asthma-related anxiety

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

New tool to assess asthma-related anxiety

May 5, 2011
When children or adolescents with asthma and their parents become overly anxious about the disorder, it may impair their ability to manage the asthma effectively. A new, effective tool to assess asthma-related anxiety is ...

Poorly controlled asthma costly

August 4, 2011
Poorly controlled asthma more than doubles healthcare costs associated with the disease and threatens educational achievement through a dramatic increase in school absence, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. ...

Alternative medicine doesn't affect asthma care in children

April 10, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is not associated with adherence to pediatric asthma treatment, according to a study published online April 9 in Pediatrics.

Late preemie birth may be linked to higher asthma risk

March 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Babies born just a few weeks early appear to face a greater risk of developing asthma when compared with children born at full term, new research reveals.

Recommended for you

Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children

December 15, 2017
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter—a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber—are more ...

Bioengineers imagine the future of vaccines and immunotherapy

December 14, 2017
In the not-too-distant future, nanoparticles delivered to a cancer patient's immune cells might teach the cells to destroy tumors. A flu vaccine might look and feel like applying a small, round Band-Aid to your skin.

Immune cells turn back time to achieve memory

December 13, 2017
Memory T cells earn their name by embodying the memory of the immune system - they help the body remember what infections or vaccines someone has been exposed to. But to become memory T cells, the cells go backwards in time, ...

Steroid study sheds light on long term side effects of medicines

December 13, 2017
Fresh insights into key hormones found in commonly prescribed medicines have been discovered, providing further understanding of the medicines' side effects.

The immune cells that help tumors instead of destroying them

December 12, 2017
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. One of the most promising ways to treat it is by immunotherapy, a strategy that turns the patient's immune system against the tumor. In the past twenty years, ...

Cancer gene plays key role in cystic fibrosis lung infections

December 12, 2017
PTEN is best known as a tumor suppressor, a type of protein that protects cells from growing uncontrollably and becoming cancerous. But according to a new study from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), PTEN has a second, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.