Flip-flops: your arch enemy?

July 5, 2012
Flip-flops: your arch enemy?
Too little foot support can lead to pain and injury, doctors say.

(HealthDay) -- People of all ages wear flip-flops during the summer, but this type of footwear can cause pain and injury when worn for long periods of time, while walking on concrete or when playing sports, experts warn.

That's because flip-flops offer limited arch support and coverage for the feet, orthopedic doctors at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City said in a medical school news release.

The doctors outlined some potential health concerns associated with these casual, summer shoes.

People change how they walk when wearing flip-flops, gripping with their toes in order to keep the shoes in place. This can lead to stress in certain muscles and strain in toes, ankles, legs, hips and the back.

Because the flat and flimsy shoe bed in flip-flops does not provide adequate foot support for all-day wear, people may be at risk for arch pain, plantar fasciitis and nerve problems.

The lack of shock absorption in flip-flops also can lead to pain in the feet, legs, hips and back. Other problems associated with flip-flops include broken toes and toe nails, cuts and germs, the Mount Sinai experts said.

is another potential issue with flip-flops and other sandals. Anyone wearing this type of footwear should apply sunscreen to their feet in order to reduce their risk for .

Explore further: No butts: Reebok slapped in US on rear-toning claims

More information: The American Podiatric Medical Association has more about flip-flops.

Related Stories

No butts: Reebok slapped in US on rear-toning claims

September 28, 2011
US government regulators have clamped down on sportswear maker Reebok for claims that its buttock-toning footwear would lead to a more shapely butt for its wearers.

Popular warm-weather attire leaves delicate skin exposed to the sun

June 20, 2011
Cheap, convenient and casual, baseball caps and flip-flops have a trendy charm. Those qualities make them must-wear accessories for teens, outdoor enthusiasts, gardeners or anyone trying to keep cool during the sweltering ...

Recommended for you

Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia

December 15, 2017
How do you unwind before bedtime? If your answer involves Facebook and Netflix, you are actively reducing your chance of a good night's sleep. And you are not alone: 90 percent of Americans use light-emitting electronic devices, ...

Warning labels can help reduce soda consumption and obesity, new study suggests

December 15, 2017
Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Office work can be a pain in the neck

December 15, 2017
Neck pain is a common condition among office workers, but regular workplace exercises can prevent and reduce it, a University of Queensland study has found.

Regular takeaways linked to kids' heart disease and diabetes risk factors

December 14, 2017
Kids who regularly eat take-away meals may be boosting their risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Your pets can't put your aging on 'paws'

December 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—In a finding that's sure to ruffle some fur and feathers, scientists report that having a pet doesn't fend off age-related declines in physical or mental health.

Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence

December 14, 2017
When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers at the UC Davis Violence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.