Forefoot joints don't improve 28-joint count measurement

July 26, 2012
Forefoot joints don't improve 28-joint count measurement
For the assessment of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, including forefoot joints does not significantly improve the precision or range of measurement of the 28-tender and swollen joint count, according to a study published online July 16 in Arthritis Care & Research.

(HealthDay) -- For the assessment of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including forefoot joints does not significantly improve the precision or range of measurement of the 28-tender and swollen joint count, according to a study published online July 16 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Liseth Siemons, of the University of Twente in Enschede, Netherlands, and associates analyzed baseline measures of tender and swollen joint counts in 459 early RA patients to evaluate the contribution of assessing forefoot to the range and precision of joint count measurement.

The researchers found that 50.76 percent of patients experienced tenderness and 43.57 percent had swelling in one or more forefoot joints. Forefoot joints were more informative for the measurement of joint tenderness than for joint swelling, but inclusion of forefoot joints did not significantly improve the precision or range measurements of 28-joint counts. The existing discrepancy between the joint and patient distributions in both joint counts was not removed by the inclusion of forefoot joints.

"Forefoot joints were frequently affected on an individual level, but did not significantly improve the measurement range or precision of 28-joint counts in early RA patients," the authors write. "From a measurement perspective, reduced joint counts are appropriate for use on a population level."

Explore further: Doctors and rheumatoid arthritis patients differ on perception of disease activity

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Cross-species links identified for osteoarthritis

May 17, 2017

New research from the University of Liverpool, published today in the journal npj Systems Biology and Applications, has identified 'cell messages' that could help identify the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

Anti-hypertension DASH diet may reduce the risk of gout

May 9, 2017

The results of a study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators suggest that following a diet known to reduce the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease may also reduce the risk of gout. The team's ...

High-fat, high-carb diet a cause of osteoarthritis

April 18, 2017

Saturated fat is a prime suspect in the onset of osteoarthritis after QUT scientists found it changed the composition of cartilage, particularly in the weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.