Mediterranean diet improves health

July 25, 2012
Mediterranean diet improves health

Associate Professor Catherine Itsiopoulos of the Centre for Dietetics at La Trobe University highlights the benefits of a Mediterranean diet and lifestyle in a new La Trobe University podcast.

"The Cretan diet has the lowest death rate from ," says Dr. Itsiopoulos. "The diet is abundant with and low in meat fat, and can be very simple and easy to implement."  

Research has also shown marked improvement in condition amongst those who suffer type two diabetes.

"After three months on a Cretan diet the participants found not only had their blood glucose levels improved but also general well being; they report an increase in mood and energy as well as looking healthier," says Dr. Itsiopoulos.      

"The staple fat in a Mediterranean diet for thousands of years has been olive oil, it is a monounsaturated fat so helps to improve the balance of good and bad cholesterol.  Whilst extra virgin olive oil is rich in anti-oxidants.

"We are currently working on new studies to see the effects of a on depression and reversing fatty liver, which leads to diabetes," says Dr. Itsiopoulos.

From research findings Dr. Itsiopoulos has established ten key principles for implementing a healthy Mediterranean style diet into any type of cuisine:

• Use as the main added fat (60 mls/day)
• Eat vegetables with every meal (include 100g leafy greens and 100g tomatoes, and 200g other vegetables/day)
• Include at least two legumes meals (250g serve) per week
• Eat at least two servings of fish (150-200g serves) per week and include oily fish
• Eat meat (beef, lamb, pork and chicken) less often and not more than once per week
• Eat fresh fruit everyday and dried fruit and nuts as snacks or dessert
• Eat yogurt everyday but cheese in moderation
• Include wholegrain breads and cereals with meals
• Consume wine in moderation (1-2 glasses per day) and always with meals, don’t get drunk
• Only have sweets or sweet drinks for special occasions.

Explore further: Losing weight, keeping it off might require distinct skill sets

Related Stories

Losing weight, keeping it off might require distinct skill sets

July 5, 2011
A new study indicates that the practices that help people to lose weight and the practices that help them keep it off do not overlap much.

The Mediterranean diet is definitively linked to quality of life

May 29, 2012
For years the Mediterranean diet has been associated with a lesser chance of illness and increased well-being. A new study has now linked it to mental and physical health too.

Tips for a healthy, happy Halloween

October 20, 2011
Ghosts and goblins, vampires and werewolves, haunted houses and hayrides. Though Halloween is all about being scared silly, the shock from stepping on the scale after pilfering through the collected candy could turn your ...

Recommended for you

When traveling on public transport, you may want to cover your ears

November 22, 2017
The noise levels commuters are exposed to while using public transport or while biking, could induce hearing loss if experienced repeatedly and over long periods of time, according to a study published in the open access ...

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses

November 22, 2017
Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses, but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Air pollution linked to poorer quality sperm

November 22, 2017
Air pollution, particularly levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), is associated with poorer quality sperm, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Sunrise and sunset guide daily activities of city-dwellers

November 21, 2017
Despite artificial lightning and social conventions, the dynamics of daylight still influence the daily activities of people living in modern, urban environments, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

Older men need more protein to maintain muscles

November 21, 2017
The amount of protein recommended by international guidelines is not sufficient to maintain muscle size and strength in older men, according to a new study.

Exercising and eating well are greater contributors to health than standing at work

November 21, 2017
By now you've probably heard the edict from the health community: Sitting is the new smoking. Perhaps you've converted to a standing desk, or maybe you have a reminder on your phone to get up once an hour and walk around ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.