Significant decline of genital warts in young women

July 20, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- The incidence of condyloma or genital warts (GW) is significantly declining in young women, according to a novel register study from Karolinska Institutet. The researchers suggest that this recent development may be explained by the introduction of the national HPV vaccine program in Sweden.

, referred to as anogenital warts or condyloma acuminate, are highly infectious and transmitted sexually primarily through skin-to-skin contact. Over 90 percent of GW are caused by (HPV) types 6 and 11. The introduction of HPV vaccines have made the estimation of population-based incidence of condyloma immediately prior to and following vaccination uptake necessary for the evaluation of vaccine programme effectiveness.

In the current study, which is published in the , incidence proportions were calculated using the entire population of men and women living in Sweden between 2006-2010 ages 10-44. To define episodes of GW the drug prescription and patient registers were used.

The results show that women ages 17 and 18 years had over a 25 percent decline in GW rates when comparing 2006 with 2010, with significant decreases through age 25. Incidence among men did not decline, indicating no possible herd immunity effects during this period.

More information: Amy Levál, et al., Incidence of Genital Warts in Sweden pre and post Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine Availability, Journal of Infectious Diseases, online 19 July 2012

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections

September 22, 2017
Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause a variety of illnesses that range from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions including pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome and the flesh-eating disease formally known ...

Ecosystem approach makes urinary tract infection more treatable

September 22, 2017
The biological term 'ecosystem' is not usually associated with urinary tract infections, but this should change according to Wageningen scientists.

Residents: Frontline defenders against antibiotic resistance?

September 22, 2017
Antibiotic resistance continues to grow around the world, with sometimes disastrous results. Some strains of bacteria no longer respond to any currently available antibiotic, making death by infections that were once easily ...

Individualized diets for irritable bowel syndrome better than placebo

September 21, 2017
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome who follow individualized diets based on food sensitivity testing experience fewer symptoms, say Yale researchers. Their study is among the first to provide scientific evidence for this ...

Superbug's spread to Vietnam threatens malaria control

September 21, 2017
A highly drug resistant malaria 'superbug' from western Cambodia is now present in southern Vietnam, leading to alarming failure rates for dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-piperaquine—Vietnam's national first-line malaria treatment, ...

A dose of 'wait-and-see' reduces unnecessary antibiotic use

September 21, 2017
Asking patients to take a 'wait-and-see' approach before having their antibiotic prescriptions filled significantly reduces unnecessary use, a University of Queensland study has shown.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.