Significant decline of genital warts in young women

July 20, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- The incidence of condyloma or genital warts (GW) is significantly declining in young women, according to a novel register study from Karolinska Institutet. The researchers suggest that this recent development may be explained by the introduction of the national HPV vaccine program in Sweden.

, referred to as anogenital warts or condyloma acuminate, are highly infectious and transmitted sexually primarily through skin-to-skin contact. Over 90 percent of GW are caused by (HPV) types 6 and 11. The introduction of HPV vaccines have made the estimation of population-based incidence of condyloma immediately prior to and following vaccination uptake necessary for the evaluation of vaccine programme effectiveness.

In the current study, which is published in the , incidence proportions were calculated using the entire population of men and women living in Sweden between 2006-2010 ages 10-44. To define episodes of GW the drug prescription and patient registers were used.

The results show that women ages 17 and 18 years had over a 25 percent decline in GW rates when comparing 2006 with 2010, with significant decreases through age 25. Incidence among men did not decline, indicating no possible herd immunity effects during this period.

More information: Amy Levál, et al., Incidence of Genital Warts in Sweden pre and post Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine Availability, Journal of Infectious Diseases, online 19 July 2012

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Pair of discoveries illuminate new paths to flu and anthrax treatments

October 17, 2017
Two recent studies led by biologists at the University of California San Diego have set the research groundwork for new avenues to treat influenza and anthrax poisoning.

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis

October 17, 2017
An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Health-care ...

New tools to combat kidney fibrosis

October 16, 2017
Interstitial fibrosis – excessive tissue scarring – contributes to chronic kidney disease, which is increasing in prevalence in the United States.

How hepatitis C hides in the body

October 13, 2017
The Hepatitis C (HCV) virus is a sly enemy to have in one's body. Not only does it manage to make itself invisible to the immune system by breaking down communication between the immune cells, it also builds secret virus ...

Largest study yet of malaria in Africa shows historical rates of infection

October 12, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with members from the Kenya Medical Research Institute, the University of Oxford and the University of KwaZulu-Natal has conducted the largest-ever study of the history of malaria ...

Promising new target for treatment of psoriasis is safe, study shows

October 11, 2017
A protein known to play a significant role in the development of psoriasis can be prevented from functioning without posing a risk to patients, scientists at King's College London have found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.