Cook Islands plants show regenerative properties

August 28, 2012, University of New South Wales

A skin care product based on plants used in traditional Cook Islands remedies has been created by UNSW researchers who are also investigating the regenerative properties of the plants for use in wound and bone healing.

The TeTika cosmetics, developed with the company Cimtech's BioActive Cook Islands oil, incorporates traditional Cook Islands medicines.

TeTika means 'truth and integrity' in Cook Islands Maori.

In 2003, Dr Graham Matheson and UNSW Medicine's Professor Bill Walsh began investigating the regenerative properties of plants in partnership with the local traditional leaders.

Dr Matheson, who has completed a PhD at UNSW based on the project, founded a company that permits traditional owners to share in financial benefits from his research, which has received support from UNSW's commercialisation company, NewSouth Innovations. The company was most recently supported by Australia.

"The University and the traditional leaders and I entered into an agreement that is currently being discussed around the world at biodiversity forums as towards world's best practice in access and benefit sharing," Dr Matheson says.

Dr Matheson and Professor Walsh are now investigating that promote new and skin healing. Professor Walsh says research using the plants is a continued collaborative project.

Dr Matheson and UNSW are major shareholders in the company, Cimtech.

Explore further: Regions vary in paying prisoners to participate in research

More information: tetika.com.au/

Related Stories

Regions vary in paying prisoners to participate in research

August 17, 2012
When members of the public participate in research studies, they are often given incentives – such as cash or gift cards for food – as compensation or reimbursement for their time and effort. Not so for Canada's ...

Coffee and tea consumption reduce MRSA risk

July 15, 2011
While an apple a day may keep the doctor away, new research published in the Annals of Family Medicine say that hot tea or coffee may keep the methicillin-resistant Staphyloccus aureus, or MRSA, bug away, or at least out ...

Recommended for you

In most surgery patients, length of opioid prescription, number of refills spell highest risk for misuse

January 17, 2018
The possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse has occupied the attention of a nation in the throes of an opioid crisis looking for ways to stem what experts have dubbed an epidemic. ...

Patients receive most opioids at the doctor's office, not the ER

January 16, 2018
Around the country, state legislatures and hospitals have tightened emergency room prescribing guidelines for opioids to curb the addiction epidemic, but a new USC study shows that approach diverts attention from the main ...

FDA bans use of opioid-containing cough meds by kids

January 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—Trying to put a dent in the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday slapped strict new restrictions on the use of opioid-containing cold and cough products by kids.

Taking ibuprofen for long periods found to alter human testicular physiology

January 9, 2018
A team of researchers from Denmark and France has found that taking regular doses of the pain reliever ibuprofen over a long period of time can lead to a disorder in men called compensated hypogonadism. In their paper published ...

Nearly one-third of Canadians have used opioids: study

January 9, 2018
Nearly one in three Canadians (29 percent) have used "some form of opioids" in the past five years, according to data released Tuesday as widespread fentanyl overdoses continue to kill.

Growing opioid epidemic forcing more children into foster care

January 8, 2018
The opioid epidemic has become so severe it's considered a national public health emergency. Addiction to prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone and morphine, has contributed to a dramatic rise in overdose deaths and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.