In diabetes, gastric emptying remains stable over time

August 24, 2012
In diabetes, gastric emptying remains stable over time
Gastric emptying of solids and liquids and gastrointestinal symptoms remain stable over time in patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Gastric emptying of solids and liquids and gastrointestinal symptoms remain stable over time in patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in Diabetes Care.

Jessica Chang, M.B.B.S., of the University of Adelaide and Royal Adelaide Hospital in Australia, and colleagues examined the natural history of gastric emptying in diabetes using data from 13 patients with diabetes (12 with type 1 and one with type 2). The participants had measurements of gastric emptying, , glycated hemoglobin, upper , and autonomic available from baseline and after 24.7 ± 1.5 years.

The researchers found no change in gastric emptying of solids or liquids, with gastric emptying at follow-up related to baseline emptying. Gastrointestinal symptoms also remained stable over time. Blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower at follow-up, and autonomic function deteriorated significantly.

"In summary, this prospective study indicates that gastric emptying in patients with long-term diabetes is relatively stable over time," the authors write.

Explore further: Gut hormone receptor in brain is key to gastric emptying rate; may help prevent obesity

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