New discoveries in skin cancer: protein inhibits formation of metastases

August 17, 2012, Medical University of Vienna
New discoveries in skin cancer—protein inhibits formation of metastases

The danger of melanomas lies in the fact that they encourage the formation of new lymph vessels (lymphangiogenesis) at a very early stage and can therefore produce metastases very early on.

It is therefore crucial to find proteins that inhibit the process of lymphangiogenesis. In a study carried out by Heide Niederleithner from the University Department of Dermatology at the MedUni Vienna, it has now been demonstrated that Wnt1 is a capable of inhibiting lymphangiogenesis and the formation of in cases of malignant melanoma.

Pre-clinical studies have shown that the increased release of a signal protein, known as Wnt1, inhibits the formation of new lymphatic pathways and therefore the development of metastases. This effect of Wnt1 was previously unknown and has now been discovered and patented by researchers at the MedUni.

“There are currently no therapeutic concepts that are able to affect lymphangiogenesis. The discovery of this new, anti-lymphangiogenic function of Wnt1 represents an important step towards being able to use it on patients with at some stage in the future,” says Heide Niederleithner from the University Department of Dermatology (Department of General Dermatology).

The results of the study provide a starting point for further efforts to research this field, says Peter Petzelbauer from the University Department of Dermatology and senior author of the study, which has now been published in the highly respected Journal of Investigative : “There are already other studies going on to find even more selective substances than Wnt1 and to research the signal pathways in even more detail.”

Explore further: Parkinson's: Newly discovered antibody could facilitate early diagnosis

More information: “Wnt1 Is Anti-Lymphangiogenic in a Melanoma Mouse Model.” Heide Niederleithner, et al.. Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 10 May 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.138.

Related Stories

Parkinson's: Newly discovered antibody could facilitate early diagnosis

July 20, 2012
Conditions such as Parkinson’s disease are a result of pathogenic changes to proteins. In the neurodegenerative condition of Parkinson’s disease, which is currently incurable, the alpha-synuclein protein changes ...

New drug shrinks brain tumours in melanoma patients

May 21, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Australian researchers have reported promising results with a new drug that shrinks brain tumours in melanoma patients. Their findings are published in The Lancet medical journal today.

Recommended for you

T-cells engineered to outsmart tumors induce clinical responses in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma

January 16, 2018
WASHINGTON-(Jan. 16, 2018)-Tumors have come up with ingenious strategies that enable them to evade detection and destruction by the immune system. So, a research team that includes Children's National Health System clinician-researchers ...

Researchers identify new treatment target for melanoma

January 16, 2018
Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous ...

More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk

January 16, 2018
Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by epidemiologists ...

Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system

January 15, 2018
A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.

Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasis

January 15, 2018
Prostate tumors tend to be what scientists call "indolent" - so slow-growing and self-contained that many affected men die with prostate cancer, not of it. But for the percentage of men whose prostate tumors metastasize, ...

Pancreatic tumors may require a one-two-three punch

January 15, 2018
One of the many difficult things about pancreatic cancer is that tumors are resistant to most treatments because of their unique density and cell composition. However, in a new Wilmot Cancer Institute study, scientists discovered ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.