High-risk HPV present in subset of penile carcinomas

August 13, 2012
High-risk HPV present in subset of penile carcinomas
High-risk human papillomavirus infection is found in a subset of penile squamous cell carcinomas that may develop from undifferentiated penile intraepithelial neoplasia, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection is found in a subset of penile squamous cell carcinomas (PSCCs) that may develop from undifferentiated penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Carla Ferrándiz-Pulido, M.D., from the Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron in Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues examined the prevalence of HPV in a retrospective series of 82 patients with PSCC (69 invasive and 13 PeIN). Polymerase chain reaction assay with SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay was used for HPV detection, and genotyping was performed using a reverse hybridization line probe assay.

The researchers identified HPV DNA in 31 of 77 (40.2 percent) PSCC cases (22 of 67 invasive and nine of 10 PeIN). HPV-16 was identified in 25 of 31 (80.6 percent) cases. Most basaloid and warty tumors were hrHPV positive, while only 15 percent of usual PSCC were hrHPV positive. All hrHPV-positive PSCC had an adjacent undifferentiated PeIN. The researchers found that hrHPV infection correlated with strong p16INK4a immunostaining, and p16INK4a immunohistochemical overexpression was present in most undifferentiated PeIN. There was better overall survival, although not statistically significant, in both hrHPV-positive and p16INK4a-positive tumors.

"In this study, we detected hrHPV in 28 percent of PSCC and in 90 percent of PeIN," the authors write. "These results allow identification of a subset of PSCC in which HPV would play a triggering role and give support to the bimodal etiopathogenic hypothesis that distinguishes two different subsets of PSCC."

Explore further: Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

June 18, 2012
Among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, a history of chronic inflammation in the mouth (periodontitis, i.e. gum disease) may be associated with an increased risk of tumors positive for human papillomavirus ...

Periodontitis linked to HPV-positive head, neck tumors

June 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) there is an increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive tumors among those with a history of periodontitis, according to a study published ...

Prevalence of oral HPV infection higher among men than women

January 26, 2012
The overall prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is approximately 7 percent among men and women ages 14 to 69 years in the United States, while the prevalence among men is higher than among women, according ...

HPV improves survival for African-Americans with throat cancer

July 19, 2012
Even though the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for certain head and neck cancers, its presence could make all the difference in terms of survival, especially for African Americans with throat cancer, say Henry ...

Recommended for you

Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers

July 20, 2017
Virtually all cancer treatments used today also damage normal cells, causing the toxic side effects associated with cancer treatment. A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center ...

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes

July 20, 2017
Several known factors are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer including increasing age, being overweight after menopause, alcohol intake, and family history. However, the underlying biologic mechanisms through ...

Immune-cell numbers predict response to combination immunotherapy in melanoma

July 20, 2017
Whether a melanoma patient will better respond to a single immunotherapy drug or two in combination depends on the abundance of certain white blood cells within their tumors, according to a new study conducted by UC San Francisco ...

Discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

July 19, 2017
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which ...

Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumors

July 19, 2017
The most comprehensive analysis yet of medulloblastoma has identified genomic changes responsible for more than 75 percent of the brain tumors, including two new suspected cancer genes that were found exclusively in the least ...

Novel CRISPR-Cas9 screening enables discovery of new targets to aid cancer immunotherapy

July 19, 2017
A novel screening method developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center—using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice—has ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.