High-risk HPV present in subset of penile carcinomas

August 13, 2012
High-risk HPV present in subset of penile carcinomas
High-risk human papillomavirus infection is found in a subset of penile squamous cell carcinomas that may develop from undifferentiated penile intraepithelial neoplasia, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection is found in a subset of penile squamous cell carcinomas (PSCCs) that may develop from undifferentiated penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Carla Ferrándiz-Pulido, M.D., from the Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron in Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues examined the prevalence of HPV in a retrospective series of 82 patients with PSCC (69 invasive and 13 PeIN). Polymerase chain reaction assay with SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay was used for HPV detection, and genotyping was performed using a reverse hybridization line probe assay.

The researchers identified HPV DNA in 31 of 77 (40.2 percent) PSCC cases (22 of 67 invasive and nine of 10 PeIN). HPV-16 was identified in 25 of 31 (80.6 percent) cases. Most basaloid and warty tumors were hrHPV positive, while only 15 percent of usual PSCC were hrHPV positive. All hrHPV-positive PSCC had an adjacent undifferentiated PeIN. The researchers found that hrHPV infection correlated with strong p16INK4a immunostaining, and p16INK4a immunohistochemical overexpression was present in most undifferentiated PeIN. There was better overall survival, although not statistically significant, in both hrHPV-positive and p16INK4a-positive tumors.

"In this study, we detected hrHPV in 28 percent of PSCC and in 90 percent of PeIN," the authors write. "These results allow identification of a subset of PSCC in which HPV would play a triggering role and give support to the bimodal etiopathogenic hypothesis that distinguishes two different subsets of PSCC."

Explore further: Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

June 18, 2012
Among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, a history of chronic inflammation in the mouth (periodontitis, i.e. gum disease) may be associated with an increased risk of tumors positive for human papillomavirus ...

Periodontitis linked to HPV-positive head, neck tumors

June 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) there is an increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive tumors among those with a history of periodontitis, according to a study published ...

Prevalence of oral HPV infection higher among men than women

January 26, 2012
The overall prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is approximately 7 percent among men and women ages 14 to 69 years in the United States, while the prevalence among men is higher than among women, according ...

HPV improves survival for African-Americans with throat cancer

July 19, 2012
Even though the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for certain head and neck cancers, its presence could make all the difference in terms of survival, especially for African Americans with throat cancer, say Henry ...

Recommended for you

Alternative splicing, an important mechanism for cancer

September 22, 2017
Cancer, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, arises from the disruption of essential mechanisms of the normal cell life cycle, such as replication control, DNA repair and cell death. Thanks to the advances ...

'Labyrinth' chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells

September 21, 2017
Inspired by the Labyrinth of Greek mythology, a new chip etched with fluid channels sends blood samples through a hydrodynamic maze to separate out rare circulating cancer cells into a relatively clean stream for analysis. ...

Drug combination may improve impact of immunotherapy in head and neck cancer

September 21, 2017
Checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapy has been shown to be very effective in recurrent and metastatic head and neck cancer but only in a minority of patients. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers ...

Whole food diet may help prevent colon cancer, other chronic conditions

September 21, 2017
A diet that includes plenty of colorful vegetables and fruits may contain compounds that can stop colon cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases in pigs, according to an international team of researchers. Understanding how ...

New kinase detection method helps identify targets for developing cancer drugs

September 21, 2017
Purdue University researchers have developed a high-throughput method for matching kinases to the proteins they phosphorylate, speeding the ability to identify multiple potential cancer drug targets.

Brain cancer growth halted by absence of protein, study finds

September 20, 2017
The growth of certain aggressive brain tumors can be halted by cutting off their access to a signaling molecule produced by the brain's nerve cells, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.