Nonoperative approach feasible in advanced colon cancer

August 9, 2012
Nonoperative approach feasible in advanced colon cancer
Treating patients with surgically unresectable metastatic colon cancer and an asymptomatic intact primary tumor with bevacizumab and infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin chemotherapy is a viable and safe option, according to research published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay) -- Treating patients with surgically unresectable metastatic colon cancer and an asymptomatic intact primary tumor with bevacizumab and infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) chemotherapy is a viable and safe option, according to research published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Laurence E. McCahill, M.D., of the University of Pittsburg, and colleagues conducted a multicenter, prospective, phase II trial involving 90 patients with surgically unresectable metastatic colon cancer and an intact asymptomatic primary tumor. Participants were treated with mFOLFOX6 plus without resection of the primary tumor.

During a median follow-up of 20.7 months, the researchers found that 14 percent of patients experienced major morbidity related to their intact primary tumor, with two patients dying and 10 requiring surgery for obstruction, perforation, or abdominal pain. The cumulative incidence of major morbidity over 24 months was 16.3 percent. Eight tumors were resected without a morbidity event for attempted cure, and three others were resected for other reasons. Two patients only experienced minor morbidity events. The median overall survival was 19.9 months.

"Overall, this study identified that an initial nonoperative approach, using mFOLFOX6 combined with bevacizumab is a viable and safe option for patients faced with the dilemma of advanced, likely incurable ," the authors write. "The majority of patients (84 percent) were able to receive initial systemic therapy to better control distant disease and to avoid potential delays and complications or death related to initial surgical resection without compromising overall survival."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Adding drug to chemotherapy following colon cancer surgery does not improve disease-free survival

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Adding drug to chemotherapy following colon cancer surgery does not improve disease-free survival

April 3, 2012
Adding the drug cetuximab to a regimen of drugs used for the treatment of patients following surgery for stage III colon cancer did not result in improved disease-free survival, according to a study in the April 4 issue of ...

ASCO: Continuing avastin with 2nd-line chemo ups survival

June 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Continuing use of bevacizumab (Avastin) in combination with second-line chemotherapy improves overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who ...

Chemo combo promising for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

July 13, 2012
(HealthDay) -- The combination of temozolomide and bevacizumab seems to benefit patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), according to a study published online July 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

High survival with surgery in low-risk neuroblastoma

April 25, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Surgery alone results in high five-year event-free and overall survival (EFS and OS) rates for patients with low-risk stage 2a and 2b neuroblastoma (NBL), according to research published online April 23 in ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests colon cancer cells carry bacteria with them when they metastasize

November 24, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers working at Harvard University has found evidence that suggests a certain type of bacteria found in colon cancer tumors makes its way to tumors in other body parts by traveling with ...

Promising new treatment for rare pregnancy cancer leads to remission in patients

November 24, 2017
An immunotherapy drug can be used to cure women of a rare type of cancer arising from pregnancy when existing treatments have failed.

Researchers unravel novel mechanism by which tumors grow resistant to radiotherapy

November 23, 2017
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a key mechanism by which tumors develop resistance to radiation therapy and shown how such resistance might be overcome with drugs that are currently under development. The discovery ...

African Americans face highest risk for multiple myeloma yet underrepresented in research

November 23, 2017
Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent, according to a study ...

Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cells

November 22, 2017
Blocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, slowing their growth and making them easier to kill. This is the implication of a study led by researchers ...

One-size treatment for blood cancer probably doesn't fit all, researchers say

November 22, 2017
Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with a blood cancer called multiple myeloma, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent, according to a study ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.