Skin intrinsic fluorescence tied to coronary artery disease

August 7, 2012
Skin intrinsic fluorescence tied to coronary artery disease
Skin intrinsic fluorescence is significantly associated with coronary artery disease in middle-aged adults with a long duration of type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online July 30 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay) -- Skin intrinsic fluorescence (SIF) is significantly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in middle-aged adults with a long duration of type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online July 30 in Diabetes Care.

Baqiyyah N. Conway, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a study involving a total of 172 middle-aged adults with type 1 diabetes (mean disease duration, 36 years) to evaluate the relationship between SIF and CAD and whether this relationship was independent of renal disease.

The researchers found that 30 of the participants had CAD, and that SIF levels were significantly higher in those participants with CAD. SIF correlated strongly with CAD (odds ratio [OR], 3.5). The correlation persisted, after adjustment for age, diabetes duration, and cumulative glycemic exposure (OR, 2.4), and was stronger for men (OR, 5.6) than for women (OR, 1.4; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.61 to 3.3). With inclusion of nephropathy in the model, the OR for SIF declined to 1.7 (95 percent CI, 0.89 to 3.4).

"In conclusion, we have demonstrated a strong association between SIF and CAD in middle-aged individuals with ," the authors write. "SIF partially reflects the influence of skin advanced glycation end products, skin markers of oxidative stress and , subject age, diabetes duration, long-term glycemic control, and renal disease, which are associated with increased CAD risk."

Several authors are employees of or disclosed to Vera Light Inc., which funded the study and manufactures the SCOUT DS used to determine SIF.

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