Nearly half of young Swedes believe cancer contagious: study

August 22, 2012

Nearly half of Swedes aged between 16 and 20 think cancer is a contagious disease, according to a study by a Swedish charity supporting young patients published Wednesday.

Ung Cancer found that 44 percent of young people thought that leukaemia could be transmitted via contact with someone's blood.

"We didn't think their knowledge would be great but certain figures shocked us," said Ung Cancer's secretary general Julia Mjoernstedt.

"For example, only one percent knew that a vaccine is available against the humnan which can cause . It's terrifying."

Only a fraction of people (0.07 percent) knew that drinking alochol is a risk factor in getting cancer, although 70 percent did know about the dangers of smoking.

The charity said it would "work to increase the level of knowledge."

A total of 945 people across 13 high schools were interviewed for the study.

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freethinking
1 / 5 (5) Aug 22, 2012
Its their Socialist education thats at fault. The more progressive a country is, the dumber the population becomes.
barakn
not rated yet Aug 22, 2012
...says the guy who doesn't know the difference between "its" and "it's."
freethinking
1 / 5 (4) Aug 22, 2012
My language problem.... :) English has always been difficult for me.
mrlewish
not rated yet Aug 22, 2012
Actually some are contagious. At least the possibility of getting certain types depending on viral exposure.
AgentOfFate
1 / 5 (3) Aug 25, 2012
Wow, and its usually American youth that suffer the stereotype of being unintelligent. But way to go Sweden for being so horribly stupid, maybe read less Steig Larsson novels and more science magazines or something.
Sigh
not rated yet Aug 26, 2012
Its their Socialist education thats at fault. The more progressive a country is, the dumber the population becomes.

And you have what data to support your claim?

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