Over half of U.S. adults with HTN do not have it under control

September 5, 2012
Over half of U.S. adults with HTN do not have it under control
Of U.S. adults with hypertension, more than half have uncontrolled hypertension, yet the majority report having a usual source of care and health insurance, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

(HealthDay)—Of U.S. adults with hypertension, more than half have uncontrolled hypertension, yet the majority report having a usual source of care and health insurance, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Amy L. Valderrama, Ph.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues estimated the prevalence of hypertension awareness and treatment among adults with uncontrolled hypertension using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2010.

The researchers found that, among U.S. adults aged 18 years and older, the overall prevalence of hypertension was 30.4 percent, which corresponded to approximately 66.9 million individuals. Of these, an estimated 53.5 percent (35.8 million) had uncontrolled hypertension, including 39.4 percent who were unaware of their hypertension; 15.8 percent who were aware of their hypertension, but were untreated; and 44.8 percent who were aware of their hypertension and had uncontrolled hypertension despite receiving treatment. The majority of individuals with uncontrolled hypertension reported having a usual source of care (89.4 percent) and having (85.2 percent).

"Uncontrolled hypertension affects nearly 36 million adults in the United States, yet 32 million of these adults have a usual source of health care, and 30 million have health insurance, representing a missed opportunity for hypertension control," the authors write. "The findings in this report can be used to target populations and refine interventions to improve control."

Explore further: Blacks and hypertension link persists across age and economic status

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