Advancing the treatment of trauma

September 21, 2012
Advancing the treatment of trauma
Professor Russell Gruen.

(Medical Xpress)—With traumatic injuries claiming almost six million lives a year, improvements in care, including in the challenging areas of brain and bone injuries, and haemorrhage, are urgently needed.

Leading medical journal The Lancet today published a series led by researchers and clinicians from the National Trauma Research Institute (NTRI), a collaboration between Monash University and Alfred Health, which notes the difficulties and charts the progress in improving three critical areas of trauma care.

(TBI) is the leading cause of trauma-related deaths in developed trauma systems, haemorrhagic shock leads to most preventable trauma deaths and major musculoskeletal injury is the leading cause of long-term, trauma-related disability.

Series editor and , Monash University's Professor Russell Gruen, is the Director of the National Trauma Research Institute.

"In the case of many surgeries and interventions, we're treating injuries which the body is just not naturally equipped to overcome. Managing trauma on this scale is very challenging, both in terms of immediately treating the patient and in reducing the severity of long-term disability," Professor Gruen said.

"It's also a very challenging area to research, due to the severe and complex nature of the injuries and the differences between patients - in terms of age and other health problems. It's very difficult to obtain a sufficiently large and controlled sample in order to generate meaningful and widely-applicable results."

The articles present laboratory research and clinical trial results in TBI, haemorrhagic shock and musculoskeletal injury, comprehensively collated and analysed by NTRI researchers and leading collaborators from around the globe. The authors concluded that robust and innovative research was vital to clinical advances and identified the avenues that showed the most promise in terms of improving .

Professor Gruen said there was international recognition of the need to improve and translate promising laboratory findings to treatments in the emergency department and ongoing care.

"Dedicated collaborative efforts, such as the NTRI, are actively working to overcome the challenges that traumatic injury presents and I am confident that we will continue to see improvements in care."

Explore further: Injured children may not be getting best possible care

Related Stories

Injured children may not be getting best possible care

May 2, 2011
Most injured children are not being treated at pediatric trauma centers, arguably the most appropriate location of care for young patients, according to a study to be presented Monday, May 2, at the Pediatric Academic Societies ...

Headaches worse with mild head trauma than more severe trauma

June 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- People who've had a mild traumatic brain injury have more severe headaches and a greater number of headaches than those who've had moderate to severe brain injury, a new study finds.

Traumatic brain injury shows strong link to depression, but treatments lack study

April 14, 2011
(PhysOrg.com) -- Vanderbilt researchers conducting an extensive analysis of studies on traumatic brain injury (TBI), report today that 30 percent of TBI patients, or approximately 360,000 patients each year, will also suffer ...

Withdrawing life support for traumatic brain injuries needs cautious approach

August 29, 2011
Death following severe traumatic brain injury is associated with a highly variable incidence of withdrawal of life support at the end of life, finds a new study in CMAJ. Rates of withdrawal of life support vary between hospitals, ...

Recommended for you

Experts devise plan to slash unnecessary medical testing

October 17, 2017
Researchers at top hospitals in the U.S. and Canada have developed an ambitious plan to eliminate unnecessary medical testing, with the goal of reducing medical bills while improving patient outcomes, safety and satisfaction.

New study: Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

October 17, 2017
Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). And in recent years, the percentage of care delivered ...

No evidence that widely marketed technique to treat leaky bladder/prolapse works

October 16, 2017
There is no scientific evidence that a workout widely marketed to manage the symptoms of a leaky bladder and/or womb prolapse actually works, conclude experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Ten pence restaurant chain levy on sugary drinks linked to fall in sales

October 16, 2017
The introduction of a 10 pence levy on sugar sweetened drinks across the 'Jamie's Italian' chain of restaurants in the UK was associated with a relatively large fall in sales of these beverages of between 9 and 11 per cent, ...

New exercises help athletes manage dangerous breathing disorder

October 16, 2017
A novel set of breathing techniques developed at National Jewish Health help athletes overcome vocal cord dysfunction and improve performance during high-intensity exercise. Vocal cord dysfunction, now also referred to as ...

Learning and staying in shape key to longer lifespan, study finds

October 13, 2017
People who are overweight cut their life expectancy by two months for every extra kilogramme of weight they carry, research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.