Beetroot juice properties found to boost athletes' stamina

September 20, 2012
Beetroot juice properties found to boost athletes' stamina
Beetroot juice can boost stamina.

(Medical Xpress)—Athletes competing this summer have benefited from an unlikely ingredient to fuel their Olympic and Paralympic success.

Professor Andy Jones of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Exeter has uncovered the properties of beetroot juice in boosting athletes' stamina.

Wheelchair athlete David Weir has revealed to the UK media that beetroot juice helped him to win four gold medals in the . Team GB and Olympic and from other countries, including the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands, also used the bright purple juice in their preparations over the summer.

In a series of studies, Professor Jones and his colleagues in Sport and Health Sciences and the University of Exeter Medical School have shown that drinking beetroot juice boosts stamina. Their research explains how the high levels of contained in beetroot juice makes exercise less tiring so athletes can keep going for longer. The nitrates are converted into nitric oxide in the body, which widens blood vessels and reduces the amount of oxygen needed by muscles.

Further research from Professor Jones' lab has shown the specific benefits for cyclists and has also revealed that the juice lowers blood pressure and may improve exercise performance in older people.

Professor Andy Jones said: "This has been a fantastic summer for British sport and it is really exciting and rewarding to think that our research may have played a small part in that success. We now intend to investigate the possible benefits of dietary nitrate supplementation in people with cardiovascular, respiratory or ."

Explore further: Research reveals new secret weapon for Le Tour

Related Stories

Research reveals new secret weapon for Le Tour

July 1, 2011
Winning margins in the Tour de France can be tight – last year just 39 seconds separated the top two riders after more than 90 hours in the saddle. When every second counts, riders do everything possible to gain a competitive ...

How eating bread can lower your blood pressure

March 22, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- A new study from the University of Reading has found that even small doses of beetroot juice lower blood pressure. In addition, bread enriched with either white or red beetroot had a similar effect.

Recommended for you

Expert: Be concerned about how apps collect, share health data

October 20, 2017
As of 2016 there were more than 165,000 health and wellness apps available though the Apple App Store alone. According to Rice University medical media expert Kirsten Ostherr, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates ...

Three million Americans carry loaded handguns daily, study finds

October 19, 2017
An estimated 3 million adult American handgun owners carry a firearm loaded and on their person on a daily basis, and 9 million do so on a monthly basis, new research indicates. The vast majority cited protection as their ...

More teens than ever aren't getting enough sleep

October 19, 2017
If you're a young person who can't seem to get enough sleep, you're not alone: A new study led by San Diego State University Professor of Psychology Jean Twenge finds that adolescents today are sleeping fewer hours per night ...

Across Asia, liver cancer is linked to herbal remedies: study

October 18, 2017
Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday.

Eating better throughout adult years improves physical fitness in old age, suggests study

October 18, 2017
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia

October 18, 2017
Daily calcium intake among adults appears to vary quite widely around the world in distinct regional patterns, according to a new systematic review of research data ahead of World Osteoporosis Day on Friday, Oct. 20.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.