Beetroot juice properties found to boost athletes' stamina

September 20, 2012
Beetroot juice properties found to boost athletes' stamina
Beetroot juice can boost stamina.

(Medical Xpress)—Athletes competing this summer have benefited from an unlikely ingredient to fuel their Olympic and Paralympic success.

Professor Andy Jones of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Exeter has uncovered the properties of beetroot juice in boosting athletes' stamina.

Wheelchair athlete David Weir has revealed to the UK media that beetroot juice helped him to win four gold medals in the . Team GB and Olympic and from other countries, including the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands, also used the bright purple juice in their preparations over the summer.

In a series of studies, Professor Jones and his colleagues in Sport and Health Sciences and the University of Exeter Medical School have shown that drinking beetroot juice boosts stamina. Their research explains how the high levels of contained in beetroot juice makes exercise less tiring so athletes can keep going for longer. The nitrates are converted into nitric oxide in the body, which widens blood vessels and reduces the amount of oxygen needed by muscles.

Further research from Professor Jones' lab has shown the specific benefits for cyclists and has also revealed that the juice lowers blood pressure and may improve exercise performance in older people.

Professor Andy Jones said: "This has been a fantastic summer for British sport and it is really exciting and rewarding to think that our research may have played a small part in that success. We now intend to investigate the possible benefits of dietary nitrate supplementation in people with cardiovascular, respiratory or ."

Explore further: Research reveals new secret weapon for Le Tour

Related Stories

Research reveals new secret weapon for Le Tour

July 1, 2011
Winning margins in the Tour de France can be tight – last year just 39 seconds separated the top two riders after more than 90 hours in the saddle. When every second counts, riders do everything possible to gain a competitive ...

How eating bread can lower your blood pressure

March 22, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- A new study from the University of Reading has found that even small doses of beetroot juice lower blood pressure. In addition, bread enriched with either white or red beetroot had a similar effect.

Recommended for you

Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia

December 15, 2017
How do you unwind before bedtime? If your answer involves Facebook and Netflix, you are actively reducing your chance of a good night's sleep. And you are not alone: 90 percent of Americans use light-emitting electronic devices, ...

Warning labels can help reduce soda consumption and obesity, new study suggests

December 15, 2017
Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Office work can be a pain in the neck

December 15, 2017
Neck pain is a common condition among office workers, but regular workplace exercises can prevent and reduce it, a University of Queensland study has found.

Regular takeaways linked to kids' heart disease and diabetes risk factors

December 14, 2017
Kids who regularly eat take-away meals may be boosting their risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence

December 14, 2017
When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers at the UC Davis Violence ...

Your pets can't put your aging on 'paws'

December 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—In a finding that's sure to ruffle some fur and feathers, scientists report that having a pet doesn't fend off age-related declines in physical or mental health.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.