Genetic research addresses fatalities due to sepsis

September 17, 2012
Genetic research addresses fatalities due to sepsis
Credit: Thinkstock

The genetics of a patient affects the extent of septic shock development and response to therapy. European researchers have identified genes related to sepsis in a study group of more than 2,500 patients in Europe.

Septic shock is a condition that occurs as a result of severe infection to cause a systemic inflammatory response. Fatality from sepsis is high and mainly affects children, the elderly and those with a compromised immune system.

The 'Genetics of sepsis in Europe' (Genosept) project aimed to raise clinical awareness of how a patient's genes may affect important variables like response to treatment and possibility of fatal outcome. To achieve this goal, project scientists defined novel linked to the condition using expression studies. The identified genes were then analysed in relation to predisposition to sepsis-related mortality in European intensive care units.

Genosept scientists have established a system whereby future data can be recorded and therefore pooled in a database for further analysis. An electronic case report form (eCRF) provides details of each patient. Each eCRF is verified for quality and information content.

Most important for genotyping was the identification and evaluation of relevant candidate genes and their markers related to sepsis. Project researchers also developed processes and systems for blood sampling and genotyping tests.

Statistical analysis of the data linked the genetic variants identified with probability of mortality. Furthermore, the analysis pointed to associations between patient genes and phenotype related to sepsis outcomes.

Genosept has built a bridge between genomics and intensive care clinicians involved in this often fatal condition. Application of data means that expensive treatments for may be focused on high-risk patients. Standardisation of protocols also may be translated into the reduction of sepsis-related mortality.

Explore further: Early identification and treatment of septic shock to save lives

Related Stories

Early identification and treatment of septic shock to save lives

June 1, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Recognition of severe septic shock early and starting a patient on an effective antibiotic treatment immediately is critical to saving lives, according to an editorial by two Virginia Commonwealth University ...

Combination antibiotic treatment does not result in less organ failure in adults with severe sepsis

May 21, 2012
Frank M. Brunkhorst, M.D., of Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena, Germany, and colleagues conducted a study to compare the effect of the antibiotics moxifloxacin and meropenem with the effect of meropenem monotherapy on ...

Recommended for you

Engineered protein treatment found to reduce obesity in mice, rats and primates

October 19, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with pharmaceutical company Amgen Inc. report that an engineered version of a protein naturally found in the body caused test mice, rats and cynomolgus monkeys to lose weight. In their ...

New procedure enables cultivation of human brain sections in the petri dish

October 19, 2017
Researchers at the University of Tübingen have become the first to keep human brain tissue alive outside the body for several weeks. The researchers, headed by Dr. Niklas Schwarz, Dr. Henner Koch and Dr. Thomas Wuttke at ...

Cancer drug found to offer promising results in treating sepsis in test mice

October 19, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A combined team of researchers from China and the U.S. has found that a drug commonly used to treat lung cancer in humans offers a degree of protection against sepsis in test mice. In their paper published ...

Study reveals key molecular link in major cell growth pathway

October 19, 2017
A team of scientists led by Whitehead Institute has uncovered a surprising molecular link that connects how cells regulate growth with how they sense and make available the nutrients required for growth. Their work, which ...

Tracing cell death pathway points to drug targets for brain damage, kidney injury, asthma

October 19, 2017
University of Pittsburgh scientists are unlocking the complexities of a recently discovered cell death process that plays a key role in health and disease, and new findings link their discovery to asthma, kidney injury and ...

Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster

October 18, 2017
Scars may fade, but the skin remembers. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals that wounds or other harmful, inflammation-provoking experiences impart long-lasting memories to stem cells residing in the skin, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.