Study supports tobacco link to ovarian cancer

September 12, 2012
A major outcome was evidence to support smoking’s link to the disease, which until recently had not been considered a risk factor. Image: Micke Jakobsson

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers from Curtin University's School of Public Health have contributed to a comprehensive international study examining risk factors for ovarian cancer.

Prof Andy Lee and Prof Colin Binns took part as members of the Collaborative Group on of based at Oxford University and funded by UK .

Their work involved the completion of two studies in China, which were fed into a pool of data totalling 28,114 women with, and 94,942 women without, ovarian cancer.

The aim of the project was to gather and analyse from published and unpublished sources which could shed light on the second most commonly diagnosed gynaecological cancer in Australia, one which Cancer Australia lists as having a five-year survival rate of only 40 per cent.

A major outcome was evidence to support smoking's link to the disease, which until recently had not been considered a risk factor.

"Previously there was only a weak link between smoking and ovarian cancer, coming from a paper in 2009. This new analysis firmly establishes that relationship for one particular type of ovarian cancer, mucinoid tumours, which account for about 15 per cent of the total of all ovarian cancers," Prof Binns says.

Interestingly, increased smoking-related occurrences of mucinoid tumours showed up primarily in borderline malignant tumours with no significant association with those fully malignant. Occurrences of other types of ovarian cancers showed no significant differences between current smokers and those how had never lit up.

Outcomes were consistent along 13 socio-demographic and which were taken into account, including body-mass index, use of alcohol, use of and menopausal hormone therapy.

Prof Binns says more research was needed to understand how smoking stimulated the creation of mucinoid tumours, but stressed the first step in prevention was for women to quit cigarettes.

"While giving up smoking is the best advice, we did find evidence that drinking green tea, breastfeeding, eating fruit and vegetables, getting regular exercise and avoiding obesity were also beneficial," he says.

Prof Binns says the study was a step forward and reflected well the quality of work being done at Curtin University.

"We are very proud that the work of the School of Public Health is world class and can be included in this collaborative effort with other top universities from around the world," he says.

Explore further: Ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment increases risk of borderline ovarian tumors later in life

More information: 'Ovarian cancer and smoking: individual participant meta-analysis including 28,114 women with ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies' appears in The Lancet Oncology volume 13, issue 9.

Related Stories

Ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment increases risk of borderline ovarian tumors later in life

October 27, 2011
Researchers from The Netherlands have found that subfertile women whose ovaries are stimulated into producing extra eggs for in vitro fertilisation (IVF) have an increased risk of ovarian malignancies, in particular borderline ...

Study links endometriosis with increased risk of developing 3 specific types of ovarian cancer

February 21, 2012
Women with a history of endometriosis are significantly more likely to develop three specific types of ovarian cancer (clear cell, endometrioid, and low-grade serous), according to an article published Online First in the ...

Pill and pregnancy have biggest effects on ovarian cancer risk

October 26, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Taking the Pill for 10 years can reduce the risk of ovarian cancer by almost half (45 per cent), new research part-funded by Cancer Research UK shows today.

Recommended for you

Clear link between heavy vitamin B intake and lung cancer

August 22, 2017
New research suggests long-term, high-dose supplementation with vitamins B6 and B12—long touted by the vitamin industry for increasing energy and improving metabolism—is associated with a two- to four-fold increased lung ...

Study identifies miR122 target sites in liver cancer and links a gene to patient survival

August 22, 2017
A new study of a molecule that regulates liver-cell metabolism and suppresses liver-cancer development shows that the molecule interacts with thousands of genes in liver cells, and that when levels of the molecule go down, ...

Study provides insight into link between two rare tumor syndromes

August 22, 2017
UCLA researchers have discovered that timing is everything when it comes to preventing a specific gene mutation in mice from developing rare and fast-growing cancerous tumors, which also affects young children. This mutation ...

Retaining one normal BRCA gene in breast, ovarian cancers influences patient survival

August 22, 2017
Determining which cancer patients are likely to be resistant to initial treatment is a major research effort of oncologists and laboratory scientists. Now, ascertaining who might fall into that category may become a little ...

Zebrafish larvae could be used as 'avatars' to optimize personalized treatment of cancer

August 21, 2017
Portuguese scientists have for the first time shown that the larvae of a tiny fish could one day become the preferred model for predicting, in advance, the response of human malignant tumors to the various therapeutic drugs ...

Scientists discover vitamin C regulates stem cell function, curbs leukemia development

August 21, 2017
Not much is known about stem cell metabolism, but a new study from the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) has found that stem cells take up unusually high levels of vitamin C, which then ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.