9/11 WTC health program adds 50 types of cancer

September 10, 2012

(AP)—The federal government will include about 50 types of cancer on the list of Sept. 11 World Trade Center-related illnesses covered by a program to pay for health coverage.

Democratic New York Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (KEHR'-sten JIHL'-uh-brand) and Charles Schumer and the National Institute for announced the change Monday. The institute said last June it favored expanding the $4.3 billion health program to include cancer.

Scientists say there's little research to prove exposure to from the destroyed twin towers caused even one kind of cancer. Questions about whether dust caused cancer were a reason Congress didn't include it in the initial list of covered illnesses.

But an advisory panel said it was plausible first responders and others who were exposed to the toxic dust might get cancer.

Explore further: Government panel favors some WTC cancer claims

shares

Related Stories

Government panel favors some WTC cancer claims

February 16, 2012
(AP) -- A government panel favors expanding an aid program for people sickened by World Trade Center dust to include people who have at least some types of cancer.

US wants 9/11 health program to include 50 cancers

June 8, 2012
(AP) — First responders and New York-area residents who were stricken with cancer after being exposed to the toxic ash that exploded over Manhattan when the World Trade Center collapsed would qualify for free treatment ...

World Trade Center-exposed NYC firefighters face increased cancer risk

September 2, 2011
In the largest cancer study of firefighters ever conducted, research published in this week's 9/11 Special Issue of The Lancet found that New York City firefighters exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster site ...

Tough choice looms on 9/11 health lawsuits

December 26, 2011
(AP) -- More than 1,600 people who filed lawsuits claiming that their health was ruined by dust and smoke from the collapsed World Trade Center must decide by Jan. 2 whether to keep fighting in court, or drop the litigation ...

Recommended for you

When traveling on public transport, you may want to cover your ears

November 22, 2017
The noise levels commuters are exposed to while using public transport or while biking, could induce hearing loss if experienced repeatedly and over long periods of time, according to a study published in the open access ...

Moderate coffee drinking 'more likely to benefit health than to harm it', say experts

November 22, 2017
Drinking coffee is "more likely to benefit health than to harm it" for a range of health outcomes, say researchers in The BMJ today.

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses

November 22, 2017
Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses, but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Air pollution linked to poorer quality sperm

November 22, 2017
Air pollution, particularly levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), is associated with poorer quality sperm, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Sunrise and sunset guide daily activities of city-dwellers

November 21, 2017
Despite artificial lightning and social conventions, the dynamics of daylight still influence the daily activities of people living in modern, urban environments, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

Older men need more protein to maintain muscles

November 21, 2017
The amount of protein recommended by international guidelines is not sufficient to maintain muscle size and strength in older men, according to a new study.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.