Exercise stimulates adiponectin, raises HDL levels

October 18, 2012
Exercise stimulates adiponectin, raises HDL levels
Intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss significantly improves high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, which is partially mediated by stimulation of adiponectin production, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Journal of Lipid Research.

(HealthDay)—Intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) significantly improves high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, which is partially mediated by stimulation of adiponectin production, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Journal of Lipid Research.

L. Maria Belalcazar, M.D., of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and colleagues conducted the Look AHEAD study involving 1,397 overweight and obese adults with to determine whether ILI would alter adiponectin and potentially mediate the increase in low HDL-C compared with standard diabetes support and education (DSE).

The researchers found that ILI correlated with a significant increase in baseline HDL-C and adiponectin, by 9.7 and 11.9 percent, respectively, compared with the 1.3 and 0.2 percent increases achieved with standard DSE. Adiponectin changes were significantly associated with HDL-C changes, even after adjustment for potentially confounding variables. The improvement in HDL-C achieved with ILI was attributed to changes in both high molecular weight (HMW) and non-HMW-adiponectin.

"In summary, we report that, when compared to usual care, ILI exerted important changes on HMW-adiponectin and non-HMW-adiponectin levels, and that their combined effect, easily assessed by measuring total adipnectin change, may partially mediate the increases in HDL-C with ILI, independently of changes in triglyceride, weight, fitness and ," the authors write. "Our findings suggest an active role for adipose tissue function in the modulation of HDL metabolism."

Explore further: With a little exercise, your fat cells may coax liver to produce 'good' cholesterol

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

With a little exercise, your fat cells may coax liver to produce 'good' cholesterol

October 9, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—With a little exercise and dieting, overweight people with type 2 diabetes can still train their fat cells to produce a hormone believed to spur HDL cholesterol production, report medical researchers from ...

Nutrition type affects endocrinology in SGA infants

August 1, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants who are formula-fed (FOF) have elevated endocrine levels of high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin and insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I) compared with breastfed (BRF) ...

Arterial stiffness inversely tied to plasma adiponectin levels

September 27, 2012
(HealthDay)—Arterial stiffness is inversely related to plasma adiponectin levels in young, normotensive patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Diabetes Care.

Weight loss and increased fitness slow decline of mobility in adults

March 28, 2012
Weight loss and increased physical fitness nearly halved the risk of losing mobility in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes, according to four-year results from the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial ...

Low HDL cholesterol ups risk of diabetic nephropathy

August 22, 2012
(HealthDay) -- High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an independent risk factor for the development of diabetic nephropathy, but not retinopathy, in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to research published ...

Maternal glycemic status linked to epigenetic changes

March 9, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Maternal glycemic status and adiponectin levels are linked to epigenetic changes in the adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ), according to a study published online March 6 in Diabetes.

Recommended for you

Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new study

January 17, 2018
Named after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent Yale-led study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure ...

Weight flux alters molecular profile, study finds

January 17, 2018
The human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting state

January 17, 2018
The HLF gene is necessary for maintaining blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in ...

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation

January 17, 2018
Constipation is an underestimated and debilitating medical issue related to the opioid epidemic. As a growing concern, researchers look to new tools to help patients with this side effect of opioid use and aging.

Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it starts

January 16, 2018
For anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain.

Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease risk

January 16, 2018
Massive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.