Canada tackles mental health woes in developing countries

October 10, 2012

Canada announced Wednesday it was disbursing Can$19.4 million in aid for 14 poorer countries to treat mental health disorders.

" are maybe the most neglected of neglected diseases," said Peter Singer, head of government-funded Canada.

He said that 75 percent of people with mental disorders around the world, or 350 million, were in developing countries.

"And 85 percent of these people are untreated," Singer told AFP.

The funding will go to support projects in Afghanistan, Belize, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Several of these countries are war-torn or rebuilding after .

Singer said the aid will be used to train specialists, care for children with autism, as well as identify and treat problem drinking, people with dementia and severe post-war mental disorders, and expand global access to online .

The need is enormous. For comparison, Singer outlined that in Canada there is one psychiatrist available for every 8,000 people, while in Ethiopia one is available for every two million people.

In places like Afghanistan, which has suffered through decades of conflict, an estimated 50 percent of Afghans over 15 years old suffer from depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder or substance abuse.

Explore further: High rates of substance abuse exist among veterans with mental illness

Related Stories

High rates of substance abuse exist among veterans with mental illness

April 19, 2011
A new study published in The American Journal on Addictions reveals that Veterans who suffer from mental health disorders also have high rates of substance use disorders.

Study: Many Europeans have mental disorders

September 6, 2011
(AP) -- Some 38 percent of Europeans, or 165 million people, suffer from mental illness or neurological disorders on a broad spectrum ranging from anxiety to dementia, a new study published Tuesday says. Most are not being ...

350 million people have depression in world: WHO

October 9, 2012
More than 350 million people suffer from depression globally, the World Health Organization said, ahead of World Mental Health Day on Wednesday.

Long-term effect of war on healthcare costs

January 26, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- In the largest study of its kind, researchers have found that exposure to war and its effect on mental health are linked to a substantial increase in health care costs which remain high many years after ...

Recommended for you

After searching 12 years for bipolar disorder's cause, team concludes it has many

December 15, 2017
Nearly 6 million Americans have bipolar disorder, and most have probably wondered why. After more than a decade of studying over 1,100 of them in-depth, a University of Michigan team has an answer - or rather, seven answers.

Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study

December 14, 2017
Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). They also found that ketamine's ...

Do bullies have more sex?

December 14, 2017
Adolescents who are willing to exploit others for personal gain are more likely to bully and have sex than those who score higher on a measure of honesty and humility. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Evolutionary ...

Children's screen-time guidelines too restrictive, according to new research

December 14, 2017
Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Paediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact ...

Eating together as a family helps children feel better, physically and mentally

December 14, 2017
Children who routinely eat their meals together with their family are more likely to experience long-term physical and mental health benefits, a new Canadian study shows.

The iceberg model of self-harm

December 14, 2017
Researchers have created a model of self-harm that shows high levels of the problem in the community, especially in young girls, and the need for school-based prevention measures.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.