Risk factors predict childhood obesity, researchers find

October 30, 2012

High birth weight, rapid weight gain and having an overweight mother who smokes can all increase the risk of a baby becoming obese later in childhood, research by experts at The University of Nottingham has found.

The study, published in the latest edition of the journal , also discovered that children who were breastfed and were introduced to solid food later had a slightly reduced chance of becoming .

The findings come following a systematic review and analysis of data from around 30 previous studies looking at the impact of factors affecting babies during the first 12 months of their lives and their potential link with childhood obesity.

The study was undertaken by PhD student Stephen Weng, supported by a team led by Dr Sarah Redsell in the University's School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy. The team also included Professor Cris Glazebrook and Professor Min Yang of the Institute of Mental Health, and Dr Judy Swift, School of Biosciences. The study was funded by NHS Nottinghamshire County PCT

The first study of its kind to review all the evidence for risk factors in associated with childhood obesity, it is hoped the findings will help to bridge the gap between research and the implementation of new clinical practice.

Dr Redsell said: "The results of this study effectively identify the most significant risk factors by analysing data from a large number of other studies that have previously been conducted. This will offer a robust starting point for further research that will identify the most appropriate ways in which this information could be useful in healthcare practice."

In the UK around one-quarter of children aged four to five years old and one-third of 10 to 11-year-olds are overweight and evidence suggests that children who are overweight at the age of five are more likely to be obese in adulthood.

Up to now, support from GPs and health visitors has centred on advice on and breastfeeding but many practitioners believe more should be done to identify infants who are at risk of becoming obese at an earlier age.

The analysis of previous studies showed that:

  • Children of mothers who were overweight before pregnancy were 1.37 times more likely to be overweight at the age of three; 4.25 more likely to be overweight at the age of seven; and 2.36 times more likely to be overweight between the ages of nine and 14 years.
  • Six out of seven studies looking at infant showed a significant association between babies who were heavy at birth and obesity in later childhood.
  • Six studies investigating rapid weight gain in babies in their first year of life found strong links with obesity—one study found that those babies in the top 20 per cent of monthly weight gain were 3.9 times more likely to be overweight at the age of four and a half years old.
  • Children with mothers who smoked during pregnancy were 47 per cent more likely to be overweight compared to the children of non-smoking mothers.
  • Children who were breastfed—however briefly—were 15 per cent less likely to become overweight in childhood compared to those children who were never breastfed.
  • There is some evidence that giving solid foods early can be linked to later obesity—one study found that formula-fed babies given solid foods before four months were 6.3 times more likely to be overweight at three years of age than those where solid food was introduced between four and five months.
  • No compelling evidence to show a link between and maternal age or education at birth, maternal depression or ethnicity and inconclusive evidence for delivery type, in the womb, maternal weight loss after birth and 'fussy' infant temperament.

The research could be used to compile a 'checklist' for GPs and health visitors to help them spot infants most at risk of becoming obese later in life. However, researchers say more work is needed to study the practical and ethical considerations of such an intervention, including whether it would be accepted by parents and could feasibly be introduced in the current health service.

Any risk factor checklist, they say, would also require testing in the field and would need to be accompanied by clear clinical guidelines for healthcare practitioners.

Explore further: Overweight and smoking during pregnancy boost risk of overweight kids

Related Stories

Overweight and smoking during pregnancy boost risk of overweight kids

October 30, 2012
Mums who carry too much weight and/or who smoke during pregnancy increase the risk of having overweight kids, indicates a systematic analysis of the available evidence published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Recommended for you

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized

November 17, 2017
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types ...

Reversing negative effects of maternal obesity

November 8, 2017
A drug that increases energy metabolism may lead to a new approach to prevent obesity in children born to overweight mothers, UNSW Sydney researchers have found.

Serving water with school lunches could prevent child, adult obesity: study

November 7, 2017
Encouraging children to drink plain water with their school lunches could prevent more than half a million youths in the U.S. from becoming overweight or obese, and trim the medical costs and indirect societal costs associated ...

Why do some obese people have 'healthier' fat tissue than others?

November 1, 2017
One little understood paradox in the study of obesity is that overweight people who break down fat at a high rate are less healthy than peers who store their fat more effectively.

Engineered protein treatment found to reduce obesity in mice, rats and primates

October 19, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with pharmaceutical company Amgen Inc. report that an engineered version of a protein naturally found in the body caused test mice, rats and cynomolgus monkeys to lose weight. In their ...

Nearly 4 in 10 U.S. adults now obese (Update)

October 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Almost forty percent adults in the United States are now obese, continuing an ever-expanding epidemic of obesity that's expected to lead to sicker Americans and higher health care costs.

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

tadchem
not rated yet Oct 30, 2012
Risk factors don't cause anything. Causal factors cause obesity and almost every other observable condition within the universe. What we are seeing here is a team of researchers blindly testing a possible cause (risk factor) to see if there may be reason to redesignate it as a probable cause (likely factor) or a definite cause (causal factor) in some observable condition.
The causal factors of obesity are still unknown. If they weren't, then obesity would be universally and immediately curable.
Pam Peeke MD
not rated yet Nov 06, 2012
I think you're splitting hairs -- or this article is a bit hyperbolic. While risk does not sign and seal a condition, it is a precursor that both mother and, later, child need to be aware of. These factors may not be a map of the future, but they can be a road map to avoid a particular future.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.