Intracranial tumors can be resected safely in elderly

October 21, 2012
Intracranial tumors can be resected safely in elderly
Elderly patients do not have poorer short-term outcomes after surgical resection of primary or metastatic intracranial tumors, after accounting for other risk factors, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Cancer.

(HealthDay)—Elderly patients do not have poorer short-term outcomes after surgical resection of primary or metastatic intracranial tumors, after accounting for other risk factors, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Cancer.

Andreea Seicean, M.P.H., of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, and colleagues conducted a prospective study using data from the American College of Surgeons' National -Improvement Project database from 2006 to 2010. Outcomes were assessed for 134 patients aged 75 years and older and 134 -matched patients aged 40 to 74 years of age who underwent craniotomy for resection of .

The researchers found no increase in the odds for poorer short-term outcomes with advanced age. There were no significant differences in minor or major complications between the groups, and no significant differences in return to the operating room or 30-day mortality.

"Contrary to common assumptions, our analysis of a large, prospective, multi-institutional database suggests that advanced age does not predispose individuals undergoing aggressive surgical therapy for primary or metastatic intracranial tumor to increased risk for operative or short-term postoperative morbidity or mortality," the authors write.

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