AAP provides grief counseling guidance for pediatricians

November 26, 2012
AAP provides grief counseling guidance for pediatricians
Pediatricians have an important role in supporting parents and siblings following the death of a child, according to a clinical report published online Nov. 26 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Pediatricians have an important role in supporting parents and siblings following the death of a child, according to a clinical report published online Nov. 26 in Pediatrics.

Esther Wender, M.D., and colleagues from the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and , present guidelines to help pediatricians provide support to the parents and any still in his or her practice after the death of a child.

The researchers acknowledge that pediatricians may be reluctant to become involved given the pain of confronting grieving family members, but they are well placed to assist families through their grief with the aim of preventing future problems. Pediatricians should be aware that the grief after the loss of a child is intense, and may last longer than many expect—usually years. Failure to acknowledge the death of an infant, child, or adolescent can contribute to the family's grief. Recognition of the special issues experienced by grieving siblings is important for follow-up with siblings who are still patients. Self-help support groups play an important role in helping parents, and pediatricians should become aware of such groups. In the case of suicide through use of alcohol or drugs, or homicide, the grief is particularly intense and is often accompanied by guilt and/or anger. Counseling should be considered in these cases. When the parents have preexisting or had a with their child, grief is likely to be complicated and referral to a may be appropriate.

"The goal of this guidance is to prevent outcomes that may impair the health and development of affected parents and children," the authors write.

Explore further: Pediatricians should provide support for adoptive families

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Pediatricians should provide support for adoptive families

September 25, 2012
(HealthDay)—As more children are adopted each year, pediatricians must be knowledgeable about adoption issues and model positive language for adoptive families, according to a clinical report published online Sept. 24 in ...

Children experience differing changes one year after a sibling's death from cancer

November 16, 2011
The majority of children experience personal changes and changes in relationships one year after their sibling has died from cancer; however, positive and negative changes are not universal. These are the findings from the ...

Sudden death of a parent may pose mental health risks for children

September 7, 2011
In the first longitudinal study of its kind, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have found that 40 percent of children bereaved by sudden parental death will require intervention to prevent prolonged ...

Recommended for you

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk

June 22, 2017
New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.

Fidget spinners are the latest toy craze, but the medical benefits are unclear

June 21, 2017
Last week, German customs agents in Frankfurt Airport seized 35 metric tons of an imported plastic device, destroying the shipment for public safety purposes before it could infiltrate the country's marketplaces.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.