G.Bissau warns AIDS patients without treatment since coup

November 21, 2012

HIV-positive people in Guinea Bissau have been without access to treatment since the Global Fund to fight AIDS suspended funding over an April military coup, the west African nation's AIDS boss said Wednesday.

"Our main funders, the Global Fund, suspended " following the April 12 coup, said Joao Jose Silva Monteiro, coordinator of the national secretariat to fight AIDS.

"Our staff and volunteers are no longer being paid and the drugs have dried up," he warned. "Many patients no longer come to us because they are demoralised and are convinced they are going to die."

He stressed that his organisation, which is part of the , did not conduct work of a political nature and appealed for funding to resume.

"One cannot punish it as if it were part of the government," Monteiro said.

According to government figures, Guinea Bissau has an rate of 3.3 percent, one of the highest in western Africa.

The April coup leaders have handed over power to a civilian administration following a transition deal but many of the country's Western partners do not recognise the new authorities and have frozen aid.

Explore further: Ukraine urged to step up AIDS fight

Related Stories

Ukraine urged to step up AIDS fight

January 16, 2012
(AP) -- The head of a global health fund on Monday urged Ukraine to step up its efforts to fight the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Europe's largest.

Two-thirds of Myanmar HIV patients untreated: MSF

February 22, 2012
International funding cuts threaten to deepen an HIV crisis in Myanmar, where tens of thousands of people are denied lifesaving treatment, an aid agency said Wednesday.

Global Fund to Fight AIDS to slash over 100 jobs

May 2, 2012
The Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria said Wednesday it is cutting over 100 jobs, in an overhaul after a rough financial period and a scandal in which millions of dollars went missing.

HIV-2 infection inhibits HIV-1 disease progression

July 19, 2012
(HealthDay) -- While many people don't know it, there's more than one kind of AIDS virus. Besides the HIV-1 strain that's common throughout the world, a type known as HIV-2 is found in some parts of Africa. Now, a new study ...

Recommended for you

Scientists capture first high-resolution image of key HIV protein transitional state

July 13, 2017
A new, three-dimensional snapshot of HIV demonstrates the radical structural transformations that enable the virus to recognize and infect host cells, according to a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute ...

Barrier to autoimmune disease may open door to HIV, study suggests

July 11, 2017
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered that a process that protects the body from autoimmune disease also prevents the immune system from generating antibodies that can neutralize the ...

Team tests best delivery mode for potential HIV vaccine

June 20, 2017
For decades, HIV has successfully evaded all efforts to create an effective vaccine but researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) are steadily inching ...

Mathematical modeling uncovers mysteries of HIV infection in the brain

June 19, 2017
After uncovering the progression of HIV infection in the brain thanks to a new mathematical model developed by a UAlberta research team, clinicians and researchers are developing a nasal spray to administer drugs more effectively.

Understanding HIV's persistence

June 19, 2017
Most cells in the human body have a limited lifespan, typically dying after several days or weeks. And yet, HIV-1 infected cells manage to persist in the body for decades. Current treatment for HIV is very effective at suppressing ...

Knowing HIV levels are 'undetectable' may affect sexual behavior

June 15, 2017
Understanding and responding to behavioral trends in groups that are at high risk for HIV infection is critical to the development of effective strategies that decrease HIV incidence and improve access to care. New research ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.