Hispanics more heart-healthy than other americans: study

November 6, 2012
Hispanics more heart-healthy than other americans: study
Poor diets and obesity are still common, however.

(HealthDay)—Hispanic Americans meet more heart-healthy goals than other racial and ethnic groups in the United States, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 16,000 Hispanic-American adults of Cuban, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Central and South American origins to determine if they met the 's seven cardiovascular for 2020.

Compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the United States, Hispanics had higher rates of ideal blood pressure, cholesterol and , were less likely to smoke, and were more likely to get recommended amounts of exercise.

Like most Americans, however, too few Hispanics ate a heart-healthy diet and too many were overweight, the investigators found.

The study found that 5 percent of Hispanic Americans met six of the seven goals, which is higher than the national average of less than 4 percent. About 53 percent had ideal blood pressure, which is nearly 22 percent higher than the national rate.

Nearly 52 percent of Hispanic Americans had ideal levels of moderate to , which is 23 percent higher than the national rate.

Only 2 percent of Hispanic Americans ate an ideal heart-healthy diet, however, and less than 25 percent had an ideal (BMI) compared to the national rate of 32 percent. BMI is a measurement of body fat based on height and weight.

The study is scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Los Angeles.

"We found remarkable variability in [] rates among Latino ethnicities that underscores the importance of understanding the unique cardiovascular health characteristics of this culturally diverse and increasingly important population in the United States," study lead author Hector Gonzalez, associate professor in the department of family medicine and public health at Wayne State University in Detroit, said in an association news release.

The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Explore further: By 2020 majority of adults in America will be overweight, suffer from diabetic conditions

More information: Here's where you can learn more about the American Heart Association's heart health goals.

Related Stories

By 2020 majority of adults in America will be overweight, suffer from diabetic conditions

November 16, 2011
In 2020, the vast majority of adults in America will be overweight or obese and more than half will suffer from diabetes or pre-diabetic conditions, according to projections presented by Northwestern Medicine researchers ...

US Hispanics at high risk for cardiovascular disease

November 5, 2012
In a study that involved more than 16,000 Hispanic/Latino men and women living in the United States, the prevalence of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors was high and varied markedly across different background ...

Study reveals differences in overall health of Latino-American subgroups

October 2, 2012
Despite a shared Latino heritage, there are significant differences in the overall health and the use of health-care services among Cuban-Americans, Mexican-Americans and Puerto Rican-Americans—even between men and women ...

Racial make-up of community impacts obesity risk

June 27, 2012
The racial and ethnic composition of a community is associated with the obesity risk of individuals living within the community, according to a study led by researchers at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) ...

Hospital survival differs among Hispanic and non-Hispanic heart failure patients

March 13, 2012
The odds of surviving their hospital stay for heart failure differ between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients according to their level of heart function, even when they received equal care in hospitals participating ...

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.