New study seeks to understand 'post-sex blues'

November 7, 2012

(Medical Xpress)—Women are invited to take part in a QUT study that is trying to understand why some people experience 'post-sex blues'.

The research continues on from a study published in the International Journal of which found one in three (32.9 per cent) of more than 200 surveyed had experienced the at some point in their lives.

And nearly 10 per cent of the women surveyed reported experiencing symptoms such as distress some of the time following consensual sex.

QUT Associate Professor Robert Schweitzer, from QUT's School of Psychology & Counselling, said the follow-up studies would try to better understand the experience and causes of post-coital dysphoria, the experience of negative feelings following consensual sex.

"The original findings are so counter-intuitive. Everyone imagines sex as an enjoyable experience," he said.

"But there seems to be a group of people who, in fact, experience distress following intercourse.

"It's not easy to explain and the area is highly under-researched. There are few published studies on sex in the post-coital period."

The follow-up study involves confidential interviews with women who experience symptoms of post-sex blues such as distress or nostalgia following intercourse.

"We want to gain a better understanding of 's experience following consensual ," Professor Schweitzer said.

"This study will hopefully help people who experience post-coital dysphoria realise that they are not alone," he said.

"Once we understand the experience we can start thinking about the role of clinicians in assisting people to understand and to address issues causing concern."

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RobertKarlStonjek
not rated yet Nov 07, 2012
In the old days we just used to call it a 'hangover'.

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