New study seeks to understand 'post-sex blues'

November 7, 2012, Queensland University of Technology

(Medical Xpress)—Women are invited to take part in a QUT study that is trying to understand why some people experience 'post-sex blues'.

The research continues on from a study published in the International Journal of which found one in three (32.9 per cent) of more than 200 surveyed had experienced the at some point in their lives.

And nearly 10 per cent of the women surveyed reported experiencing symptoms such as distress some of the time following consensual sex.

QUT Associate Professor Robert Schweitzer, from QUT's School of Psychology & Counselling, said the follow-up studies would try to better understand the experience and causes of post-coital dysphoria, the experience of negative feelings following consensual sex.

"The original findings are so counter-intuitive. Everyone imagines sex as an enjoyable experience," he said.

"But there seems to be a group of people who, in fact, experience distress following intercourse.

"It's not easy to explain and the area is highly under-researched. There are few published studies on sex in the post-coital period."

The follow-up study involves confidential interviews with women who experience symptoms of post-sex blues such as distress or nostalgia following intercourse.

"We want to gain a better understanding of 's experience following consensual ," Professor Schweitzer said.

"This study will hopefully help people who experience post-coital dysphoria realise that they are not alone," he said.

"Once we understand the experience we can start thinking about the role of clinicians in assisting people to understand and to address issues causing concern."

Explore further: Group sex among adolescents a public health concern, new study says

Related Stories

Group sex among adolescents a public health concern, new study says

December 16, 2011
One in 13 teenage girls, aged 14 to 20, reported having a group-sex experience, with those young women more likely to have been exposed to pornography and childhood sexual abuse than their peers, according to a new study ...

Recommended for you

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

Your dishwasher is not as sterile as you think

January 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Your dishwasher may get those plates spotless, but it is also probably teeming with bacteria and fungus, a new study suggests.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

RobertKarlStonjek
not rated yet Nov 07, 2012
In the old days we just used to call it a 'hangover'.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.