Psychology & Psychiatry

First-of-its-kind book addresses psychiatric epidemiology

The first volume of historical scholarship addressing psychiatric epidemiology was published over the summer, co-edited by CUNY SPH Professor Emeritus Gerald Oppenheimer. "Reimagining Psychiatric Epidemiology in a Global ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Detection of pitch errors in well-known songs

Ever notice when someone's singing out of key? Like when you're in a karaoke bar and your best friend belts out her favorite Adele track but woefully misses the mark? Ever wonder how you know right away she's singing flat?

Psychology & Psychiatry

Understanding sex as a self-injury

The term "sex as self-injury" is used to describe when a person harms themself through various sexual practices. A new study in Sweden has examined how the concept has been portrayed in the media over a ten-year period—descriptions ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Impostor syndrome: When self-doubt gets the upper hand

People who systematically underestimate themselves and their own performance suffer from so-called impostor phenomenon. They think that any success is due to external circumstances or just luck and chance. Those people live ...

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Phenomenon

A phenomenon (from Greek φαινόμενoν), plural phenomena, is any observable occurrence. Phenomena are often, but not always, understood as 'appearances' or 'experiences'. These are themselves sometimes understood as involving qualia.

The term came into its modern philosophical usage through Immanuel Kant, who contrasted it with noumenon (for which he used the term Ding an sich, or "thing-in-itself"), which, in contrast to phenomena, are not directly accessible to observation. Kant was heavily influenced by Leibniz in this part of his philosophy, in which phenomenon and noumenon serve as interrelated technical terms.

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