Psychology & Psychiatry

High levels of sexism fuel poor mental health among women

One in five women report sex discrimination and these women are more likely to develop poorer mental health after the sexist experience, according to a new UCL study investigating links between sexism and mental health and ...

Genetics

There is no 'gay gene,' major study concludes

There's no such thing as a single "gay gene" that drives a person's sexual behavior, concludes the largest genetic study ever conducted on the issue.

Health

Sex education: Why school and parents should work together

There is an ongoing debate in society about sex education. Now a study funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation suggests that the best approach is a combination of parents and school. And that using friends and the ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How much sex is right for you and your partner?

(HealthDay)—Are you having enough sex? It's a loaded question. "Enough," like "a lot," means different things to different people—it could mean every night, twice a week or twice a month.

Cardiology

Why do women get statins less frequently than men?

Women are less likely than men to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statins—or get them prescribed at guideline-recommended intensity levels when they do, according to a new study that also looked at reasons behind the ...

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Sex

In biology, sex is a process of combining and mixing genetic traits, often resulting in the specialization of organisms into male and female types (or sexes). Sexual reproduction involves combining specialized cells (gametes) to form offspring that inherit traits from both parents. Gametes can be identical in form and function (known as isogametes), but in many cases an asymmetry has evolved such that two sex-specific types of gametes (heterogametes) exist: male gametes are small, motile, and optimized to transport their genetic information over a distance, while female gametes are large, non-motile and contain the nutrients necessary for the early development of the young organism.

An organism's sex is defined by the gametes it produces: males produce male gametes (spermatozoa, or sperm) while females produce female gametes (ova, or egg cells); individual organisms which produce both male and female gametes are termed hermaphroditic. Frequently, physical differences are associated with the different sexes of an organism; these sexual dimorphisms can reflect the different reproductive pressures the sexes experience.

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