rhC1INH cuts attack frequency in hereditary angioedema

November 9, 2012
rhC1INH cuts attack frequency in hereditary angioedema
For patients with hereditary angioedema, weekly administration of recombinant C1INH is well tolerated and is associated with a reduction in attack frequency, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Allergy.

(HealthDay)—For patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE), weekly administration of recombinant C1INH (rhC1INH) is well tolerated and is associated with a reduction in attack frequency, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Allergy.

Avner Reshef, M.D., from the Chaim Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer, Israel, and colleagues examined the safety and prophylactic effect of weekly administration of rhC1INH (50 U/kg body weight) in a study involving 25 patients with a history of HAE attacks occurring at least every two weeks. Following a two-week run-in period, patients received rhC1INH administration every week for eight weeks, and were followed for an additional six weeks.

The researchers found that, over the past two years, participants reported attacks at a rate of 0.9/week. During the treatment period, the mean attack rate was 0.4/week. In 13 patients, 30 treatment-emergent mild-to-moderate adverse events were reported. Twenty-five days after the last study drug administration, one patient died from a laryngeal attack. , , and anxiety were reported as the only possible drug-related adverse events in one patient and hypotension was reported in another. No allergic adverse events were reported.

"In summary, weekly administration of 50 U/kg rhC1INH appeared to reduce the frequency of HAE attacks and was generally safe and well tolerated," the authors write. "These encouraging findings warrant further investigation of the clinical value of with rhC1INH."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the .

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