Sedentary behavior worsens decline in cerebral palsy

November 2, 2012
Sedentary behavior worsens decline in cerebral palsy
Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

(HealthDay)—Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

Mark D. Peterson, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues describe the impact of early muscle wasting, obesity, and on premature declines in function among adults with cerebral palsy, noting that premature decline is usually attributed to weakness, spasticity, orthopedic abnormalities, chronic pain, and fatigue.

The researchers note that the extent of atrophy and weakness in adults with cerebral palsy is likely influenced by the degree of , which greatly increases their risk of cardiometabolic disease, early mortality, premature , and functional deterioration. The decline in strength is strongly associated with declines in functional capacity, and further declines can be avoided by early detection and physical activity. The authors suggest that reducing sedentary behavior is the best first line of defense against many of the secondary comorbidities.

"In conjunction with the standard physical and occupational therapies prescribed for managing gait/mobility deficits, spasticity and range-of-motion in this population, participation in physical activity and progressive exercise is absolutely vital to prevent secondary muscle pathology and cardiometabolic comorbidity throughout adulthood," Peterson and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: New research says muscles buckle when relaxed

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

New research says muscles buckle when relaxed

November 1, 2011
Multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and other conditions involving muscle spasticity be better understood following the discovery by Australian researchers that muscle fibres buckle when at rest.

Young adults drop exercise with move to college or university: researchers

December 15, 2011
Regular exercise tends to steeply decline among youth as they move to university or college, according to a study by researchers at McMaster University.

Diabetes risk for elderly couch potatoes in Australia

July 24, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Australians aged 60 and over spend more time watching TV than other adults and are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study from The University of Queensland has found.

Recommended for you

Weight loss for adults at any age leads to cost savings, study suggests

September 26, 2017
Helping an adult lose weight leads to significant cost savings at any age, with those savings peaking at age 50, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Living near fast food outlets linked to weight gain in primary school children

September 11, 2017
Children with greater access to fast food outlets are more likely to gain weight compared to those living further away, new research suggests.

Shedding consistent pounds each week linked to long-term weight loss

August 28, 2017
When it comes to losing weight, it's not necessarily slow, but steady, that wins the race, according to new research from Drexel University.

Kids with weight issues at high risk of emotional and behavioural problems

August 10, 2017
A new, in-depth study of New Zealand children and teenagers seeking help with weight issues has found their emotional health and wellbeing is, on average, markedly worse than that of children without weight issues.

Study finds 90 percent of American men overfat

July 24, 2017
Does your waist measure more than half your height?

Are sugary drink interventions changing people's behaviour?

July 19, 2017
An evaluation of efforts designed to reduce how many sugary drinks we consume shows some success in changing younger people's habits but warns they cannot be the only way to cut consumption.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.