Higher as well as regular tea consumption benefits found

December 12, 2012 by Hope Holborow, Science Network WA
Higher as well as regular tea consumption benefits found
“It’s not just the duration of tea drinking but also quantity of tea and the frequency of intake as well [that reduces risk]”—Prof Lee. Credit: Ty Konzak

The benefits of tea drinking have been shown again in a study that has found the risk of ovarian cancer is reduced in tea drinkers.

Curtin University PhD student Dada Su conducted a hospital based in Guangzhou, China with 1,000 participants—500 patients with histologically confirmed epithelial carcinoma of the ovary and 500 unaffected women as controls—who completed a questionnaire about their consumption history.

The results display control subjects reporting higher tea and prevalence (78.8 per cent) than the ovarian cancer patients (51.4 per cent), indicating that regular is associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (in the southern Chinese women surveyed).

Those involved in the study were found to drink a mixture of green, black and oolong tea.

The experimental association study did not examine the and properties of tea involved with the prevention of ovarian cancer.

Study project leader and Curtin School of Public Health Professor Andy Lee says a dose-response relationship has also been established.

"It's not just the duration of tea drinking but also quantity of tea and the frequency of intake as well," he says.

"So the more cups you drink per day and the more the quantity of tea you drink the better the result (the lower the risk)."

Prof Lee says an important finding is that it is not just the green tea but also the oolong and drinking, which has a similar effect.

The paper states that "regular drinking of green tea, black tea and/or oolong tea was associated with a lower risk of ovarian cancer, the adjusted odds ratio being 0.29 [95 per cent confidence interval 0.22–0.39] after accounting for confounding factors".

Prof Lee hopes further research will look at the long-term survival of the ovarian cancer patients, and whether tea drinking can enhance survival rates.

"At the moment we are only looking at the development of the cancer…but we also want to find out if the more you drink tea and the longer you drink it has an effect on the survival rate."

"We note that ovarian cancer has a very poor five year survival rate of about 43 per cent or so in Australia.

"So we want to see if those patients will actually improve survival rates if they continue to drink tea," he says.

Prof Lee says as a relatively safe beverage with no toxic or any other negative associated effects, the health message of should be promoted.

Explore further: Tea drinkers may be at greater risk of prostate cancer: study

Related Stories

Tea drinkers may be at greater risk of prostate cancer: study

June 19, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Men who are heavy tea drinkers may be more likely to develop prostate cancer, according to research from scientists at the University of Glasgow which is published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer.

Green tea found to reduce rate of some GI cancers

October 31, 2012
Women who drink green tea may lower their risk of developing some digestive system cancers, especially cancers of the stomach/esophagus and colorectum, according to a study led by researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer ...

Black tea reduces blood pressure: study

January 24, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Drinking a cup of black tea three times a day may significantly reduce your blood pressure.

Recommended for you

Number of older people with four or more diseases will double by 2035, say researchers

January 23, 2018
A study published today in Age and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, reports that the number of older people diagnosed with four or more diseases will double between 2015 and 2035. A third ...

Placental accumulation of flame retardant chemical alters serotonin production in rats

January 22, 2018
A North Carolina State University-led research team has shown a connection between exposure to a widely used flame retardant chemical mixture and disruption of normal placental function in rats, leading to altered production ...

Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant

January 22, 2018
Marijuana use—by either men or women—does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers.

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.