Program benefits children with functional abdominal pain

January 4, 2013
Program benefits children with functional abdominal pain
Both children with persistent abdominal pain and their parents still benefit from a short social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy intervention a year later, according to a study published online Dec. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Both children with persistent abdominal pain and their parents still benefit from a short social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy intervention a year later, according to a study published online Dec. 31 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Rona L. Levy, M.S.W., Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of Washington in Seattle, and colleagues randomly assigned 200 children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents to education and support or three sessions of social learning and .

After 12 months, the researchers found that children who received social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy had greater decreases in gastrointestinal symptom severity and greater improvements in pain-coping responses than children who received education and support. Parents who received social learning and cognitive behavioral therapy had greater decreases in solicitous responses to their child's symptoms and greater decreases in maladaptive beliefs regarding their child's pain compared with parents who received education and support.

"Results suggest long-term efficacy of a brief intervention to reduce parental solicitousness and increase ," Levy and colleagues conclude. "Given the relative low cost of this intervention, pediatricians should consider the incorporation of these strategies into their treatment plan for children with this common complaint."

Explore further: Managing pain -- a family affair

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digitalyss
not rated yet Jan 07, 2013
Very interesting. When I was a kid all my doctor said was "She's faking it to get attention." That, of course, ended up being Crohn's disease, which required the removal of a large part of my intestines to correct seven years of scarification from infection.
However I'm absolutely certain that this originally started due to me being severely bullied on a daily basis. Hand/hand?

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