E-mail prompts improve code status documentation

January 5, 2013
E-mail prompts improve code status documentation
For patients with advanced lung cancer, prompting oncologists via e-mail successfully improved both the rate and timing of outpatient code status documentation in patients' electronic health records, according to research published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—For patients with advanced lung cancer, prompting oncologists via e-mail successfully improved both the rate and timing of outpatient code status documentation in patients' electronic health records, according to research published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Jennifer S. Temel, M.D., of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston, and colleagues conducted a study involving 100 patients with advanced lung cancer and 100 historical controls to determine whether e-mail prompts influenced oncology physicians to document code status in the outpatient electronic health record. At the start of each new , e-mail reminders were sent to .

The researchers found that significantly more patients with e-mail prompts had a code status documented in the outpatient electronic health record, compared with historical controls (33.6 versus 14.5 percent). The mean time for physicians to provide code status documentation was significantly shorter for those who received e-mail prompts compared with historical controls (8.6 versus 10.5 months).

"Brief e-mail prompts, timed to critical decision points in treatment and designed to encourage clinicians to discuss and document patients' resuscitation preferences in the outpatient electronic health record, improved the rate and timing of code status documentation compared with historical controls," Temel and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: Hospice visit number affects ability to die at home

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Hospice visit number affects ability to die at home

June 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Hospice patients with cancer are more likely to be able to die in the setting of their choice if they receive at least one hospice visit per day during the first four days of hospice care, according to research ...

Administering chemo ups income for non-salaried oncologists

January 2, 2013
(HealthDay)—Non-salaried oncologists report the potential for increased salaries with the administration of chemotherapy or growth factors for lung or colorectal cancer patients, according to a study published online Dec. ...

Socioeconomic status affects cancer trial referrals

December 7, 2012
(HealthDay)—Patients of lower socioeconomic status are less likely to be referred to participate in early-phase cancer trials compared with patients of higher socioeconomic status, according to research published online ...

U.S. doctors embracing electronic health records: survey

July 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A majority of U.S. physicians have now adopted an electronic health record system as part of their routine practice, a new national survey reveals.

Recommended for you

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus

January 17, 2018
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise ...

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

January 17, 2018
Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted—revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.