IOM urges international action to eradicate fake drugs

February 14, 2013
IOM urges international action to eradicate fake drugs
Falsified and substandard medications pose public health problems around the world, and international action should be taken to combat the phenomenon, according to a report published Feb. 13 by the Institute of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Falsified and substandard medications pose public health problems around the world, and international action should be taken to combat the phenomenon, according to a report published Feb. 13 by the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

Noting that considerable working capital is required to assure the manufacture of quality medicines, Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., from the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., and colleagues from the IOM reviewed the global implications of falsified medicines and recommended measures to eradicate the problem.

According to the authors, to improve the quality of medicine and protect consumers, the distribution system should be strengthened. Restriction of the U.S. wholesale market to firms approved by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy would tighten the American drug distribution chain and encourage better control of drug wholesalers. In low- and middle-income countries, the governments should establish an appealing environment to encourage reputable private drug sellers. Falsified and substandard medicines often are ineffective, promote , and may cause illness and death, and consequently represent a serious public health concern. Eradicating these drugs will require national regulation and international cooperation. A voluntary international agreement could go some way to achieving this aim.

"Stakeholders around the world share a common interest in combating inferior-quality drugs. At the international level, productive discussion relies on cooperation and mutual trust," the authors write. "The report advocates for an emerging consensus on once-contentious terms and lays out a plan to invest in quality to improve public health."

Explore further: Report calls for better U.S. efforts to fight counterfeit drugs

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Report calls for better U.S. efforts to fight counterfeit drugs

February 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—Aiming to reduce the global threat of counterfeit drugs, a new Institute of Medicine report also recommends changes in the United States that include a mandatory drug-tracking system and tighter licensing rules ...

International action needed to ensure the quality of medicines and tackle the fake drugs trade

November 13, 2012
Their call comes just days before 100 World Health Organisation member states hold their first meeting to discuss the problem, and the authors hope it will help to influence the debate and lead to some concrete actions.

New technology represents next-generation tool for detecting substandard and counterfeit medicines

July 26, 2012
A new platform for detecting substandard and counterfeit medicines using microfluidics has been recognized with a grant from Saving Lives at Birth's "Grand Challenge through Development." Dubbed PharmaCheck, the technology ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests ending opioid epidemic will take years

July 20, 2017
The question of how to stem the nation's opioid epidemic now has a major detailed response. A new study chaired by University of Virginia School of Law Professor Richard Bonnie provides extensive recommendations for curbing ...

Team-based model reduces prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent

July 17, 2017
A new, team-based, primary care model is decreasing prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine, which ...

Private clinics' peddling of unproven stem cell treatments is unsafe and unethical

July 7, 2017
Stem cell science is an area of medical research that continues to offer great promise. But as this week's paper in Science Translational Medicine highlights, a growing number of clinics around the globe, including in Australia, ...

Popular heartburn drugs linked to higher death risk

July 4, 2017
Popular heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been linked to a variety of health problems, including serious kidney damage, bone fractures and dementia. Now, a new study from Washington University School ...

Most reproductive-age women using opioids also use another substance

June 30, 2017
The majority of reproductive-age and pregnant women who use opioids for non-medical purposes also use at least one other substance, ranging from nicotine or alcohol to cocaine, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate ...

At-risk chronic pain patients taper opioids successfully with psychological tools

June 28, 2017
Psychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids and rebuild their lives with activities that are meaningful ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.