Pertactin-negative Bordetella pertussis identified in U.S.

February 7, 2013
Pertactin-negative <i>Bordetella pertussis</i> identified in U.S.
Pertactin-negative variants of Bordetella pertussis have been identified in the United States; and children who receive diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis priming have lower reported rates of pertussis, according to correspondence published in the Feb. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Pertactin-negative variants of Bordetella pertussis have been identified in the United States; and children who receive diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis (DTwP) priming have lower reported rates of pertussis, according to correspondence published in the Feb. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Noting an increase in the numbers of cases of pertussis in several countries, including the United States, despite increased vaccination, Anne Marie Queenan, Ph.D., from Janssen Research and Development in Raritan, N.J., and colleagues examined the contribution of pertactin-negative variants of B. pertussis. The researchers found that 11 of 12 isolates of B. pertussis cultured from specimens from children hospitalized in Philadelphia were negative for pertactin.

Juventila Liko, M.D., M.P.H., from the Oregon Health Authority in Portland, and colleagues examined the effectiveness of first-dose DTwP priming in children fully immunized with --acellular pertussis (DTaP) beyond their first year or life and in those who received a DTaP booster. Using data from April 1997 through July 2012, 484 cases of pertussis were reported, 402 of which were matched to the Oregon immunization information system ALERT IIS. The researchers found that the reported rates of pertussis were lower among children who had started the vaccination process with DTwP. Higher rates of reported pertussis were seen for children who underwent priming with acellular versus whole-cell pertussis.

"The balance between vaccine side effects and effectiveness needs to be considered in developing and implementing recommendations on pertussis vaccination, particularly in light of recent outbreaks of pertussis," Liko and colleagues write.

Explore further: Researcher says whooping cough vaccines effective, despite outbreaks

More information: Full Text - Queenan
Full Text - Liko

Related Stories

Researcher says whooping cough vaccines effective, despite outbreaks

November 29, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Despite recent outbreaks of pertussis (whooping cough)—a highly contagious bacterial disease that is preventable by the current pertussis vaccines—Yale researcher Dr. Eugene Shapiro maintains in an ...

Pertussis reaches epidemic level in Washington state

July 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Pertussis rates may reach record levels this year in the United States, where Washington state is experiencing an ongoing epidemic, according to a report published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for ...

Protection against whooping cough waned during the five years after fifth dose of DTaP

September 12, 2012
OAKLAND, Calif. − Protection against whooping cough (also called pertussis) waned during the five years after the fifth dose of the combined diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, according to researchers ...

Risk of pertussis increases as time since last dose of DTaP vaccine lengthens

November 27, 2012
In an examination of cases of childhood pertussis in California, researchers found that children with pertussis had lower odds of having received all 5 doses of the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) ...

Findings support safety of whooping cough vaccine for older adults

November 29, 2012
A new study of the safety of the tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine supports the recommendation that those 65 and older get the vaccine to protect themselves and others, particularly young babies, from ...

Recommended for you

New insights into the world of trypanosomes

August 23, 2017
Single specimens of the vermicular pathogens causing sleeping sickness swim inside the gut of the tsetse fly between blood cells which the fly has ingested from an infected mammal. This is where they start their week-long ...

Survey of DNA fragments circulating in the blood suggests vast microbial diversity

August 23, 2017
A new survey of DNA fragments circulating in human blood suggests our bodies contain vastly more diverse microbes than anyone previously understood. What's more, the overwhelming majority of those microbes have never been ...

Study a breakthrough in understanding chronic pain in children

August 23, 2017
A University of Calgary psychologist who studies pediatric pain has made a breakthrough in understanding the cause of chronic pain in adolescents—by focusing on those recovering from major surgeries.

Scientists develop infection model for tickborne flaviviruses

August 22, 2017
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have filled a research gap by developing a laboratory model to study ticks that transmit flaviviruses, such as Powassan virus. Powassan virus was implicated in the death of a ...

Zika virus stifles pregnant women's weakened immune system to harm baby, study finds

August 21, 2017
The Zika virus, linked to congenital birth defects and miscarriages, suppresses a pregnant woman's immune system, enabling the virus to spread and increasing the chances an unborn baby will be harmed, a Keck School of Medicine ...

Fatty liver can cause damage to other organs via crosstalk

August 21, 2017
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is increasingly common. Approximately every third adult in industrialized countries has a morbidly fatty liver. This not only increases the risk of chronic liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.