Cell-cycle progression panel identifies prostate cancer risk

March 28, 2013
Cell-cycle progression panel identifies prostate cancer risk
The cell-cycle progression gene panel is useful to improve the risk stratification for men with even low-risk, clinically localized prostate cancer, according to research published online March 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—The cell-cycle progression (CCP) gene panel is useful to improve the risk stratification for men with even low-risk, clinically localized prostate cancer, according to research published online March 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Matthew R. Cooperberg, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues sought to validate a previously described genetic called CCP (that provides a value calculated from the average expression of 31 CCP genes) and its ability to improve in men with localized prostate cancer and predict recurrence after prostatectomy.

The researchers found that for each increase of one unit in the CCP score, the hazard ratio increased by 1.7, after adjusting for the patient's Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Post-Surgical (CAPRA-S) score. Combining the CCP with the CAPRA-S score yielded consistently predictive outcomes across a range of clinical risk, including low-risk patients.

"The performance of the CCP score in this validation study was excellent," the authors write. "The score provided independent prognostic information after and may prove useful in helping guide decisions with respect to adjuvant treatment and in stratifying men for future adjuvant therapy studies."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to genetics firms. Myriad Genetics helped support the study.

Explore further: Radical prostatectomy doesn't cut mortality versus observation

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