Get a jump on daylight saving time

March 8, 2013, Loyola University Health System

Many people will go to work on less sleep than normal Monday because they will have trouble adjusting to Daylight Saving Time.

At 2 a.m. Sunday, March 10, clocks will jump ahead one hour, robbing us of an hour of sleep. So Loyola University Medical Center sleep specialist Dr. Sunita Kumar recommends that in the days leading up to the schedule change that people start adjusting by going to bed and getting up a few minutes earlier each day.

Other tips Kumar offers:

  • Don't nap on the Saturday before the .
  • To help reset your , expose yourself to sunlight in the morning as early as you can. This will help advance your circadian rhythm.
  • Eat dinner earlier, back up your nighttime routine and dim the lights in the evening.
  • Try to get your children to bed earlier, too. "I know I need to do this for my kids," she said.
Kumar is medical director of Loyola's Sleep Program and a fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

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